gravity wall

gravity wall

[′grav·əd·ē ‚wȯl]
(civil engineering)
A retaining wall which is kept upright by the force of its own weight.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gravity wall

gravity wall
A massive concrete wall that resists overturning by virtue of its own weight.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Delivering the panel's conclusions yesterday, the jury foreman said: "The deceased were cleaning out a bay when a free-standing gravity wall overturned due to gross over-loading.
Dam wall designs fall into two main types: gravity wall and arch wall.
In general, the dynamic displacement of the gravity wall is the result of two factors.
Cantilever walls are made with steel-reinforced concrete and use less material than a gravity wall. They convert horizontal pressures from the soil to vertical pressures on the ground.
An unusual engineering feature is one of the site's most recognizable elements - the massive "gravity wall" at the base of the site, visible from Route 146.
The soil pressures attempt to overturn the wall at the toe, but the gravity wall is designed to have a weight that is one half again heavier than the soil weight, enabling it to resist the natural soil pressures.
The soil-nailed earth becomes an exceptionally ductile and stable gravity wall. Its mode of failure is progressive and the structure is not prone to catastrophic failure.
Paul, Minnesota) is a gravity wall system wherein the weight of the wall resists the sliding action of the soil that is retained.
Several property line restrictions made the gravity wall system a perfect fit, reaching the 19-ft.