gray goods

gray goods

[′grā ‚gu̇dz]
(textiles)
Cloths of any color that have been woven in a loom but have not been otherwise treated in dry- or wet-finishing operations. Also known as greige goods.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
They see "a fundamental weakness of our democracy, that our very proud marketplace of ideas is so easily flooded with counterfeit gray goods, and to the great detriment of our political discussions and our political systems."
These products can be untreated gray goods, or coated with silicone, PTFE, or neoprene.
Pompei Chairman Vincent Wong reported that their virtual sales of gray goods have increased around 20 percent each month at the TMall site [Chiu and Chu 2014].
This note outlines a history of the regulation of imported gray goods pursuant to Trademark Law, illustrating legislative efforts and judicial support in curbing the importation of goods unintended for the United States market.
While the stores I visited featured legitimate licensed merchandise, exactly what was licensed for Croatia and what consisted of gray goods would have been difficult for anyone but the licensor and licensee to evaluate.
Rather, gray goods are genuine in terms of their manufacturer, but their distribution is unauthorized.
Thiagarajar Mills: Manufacturer of gray goods The company, a vertically integrated cotton textile mill with its own spinning, weaving and processing facilities, plans to manufacture sheets targeting mainly the U.S.
Gone as well are the gray goods that sometimes sent mixed messages to customers and employees alike.
Manufacturers can react by refusing to service gray goods and disenfranchising channel offenders (such as jobbers who sell to unauthorized distributors).
Gray goods are said to benefit the consumer at the expense of the intellectual property owner.(21) Opponents argue that gray goods undercut prices offered by authorized dealers, confuse consumers, and even reduce consumer goodwill when the products materially differ from those intended for U.S.
Edwards Argen, Ltd., described the diversion of "gray goods" - knock-offs of another company's product sold at a reduced rate - as "a theft of opportunity" that most people consider a victimless crime, but whose true victims are the consumers as well as the manufacturers.