graymail


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graymail

Email that a spam filter cannot analyze sufficiently to determine if it is legitimate or not. Graymail is often not spam, but may be newsletters that people once subscribed to or product offerings to customers who purchased from the vendor before. See spam.

The original term refers to the threat of releasing classified government documents in order to influence legal proceedings. To counter graymail, the 1980 U.S. Graymail Law allows judges to review classified material in secret.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This problem, known as "graymail," occurs when a potential criminal defendant threatens to expose sensitive classified information if he is prosecuted.
Mark Zaid, a lawyer who has represented people charged with espionage, said these threats from Snowden and Greenwald are a form of graymail, a tactic in which defendants charged with spying try to force the government to drop the charges by threatening to expose U.S.
Anyone, whether or not a bona fide victim of military misconduct, could sue and then use graymail (the threat of disclosing secrets) to extract an undeserved settlement.
(327) This situation has traditionally been called "graymail" to suggest that the defendant may be seeking to introduce classified information to force the prosecution to dismiss the charges.
Also adds graymail filtering to improve employee productivity.
Software giant Microsoft has overhauled Hotmail in an update that "declares war on graymail".
The Court has insisted both on protecting officials' good faith decisions even when erroneous (if they were not erroneous, of course, they would not need the immunity), and on ensuring in immunity-worthy cases that this shield operates at the threshold--that is, before the official is subjected to the burdens of discovery, the financial costs and trauma of litigation, the risks of potential liability, and the temptation to reduce those risks by testifying in ways that compromise legitimate governmental secrets ("graymail").
(144) This lead to a practice called "graymail" where defendants would request classified information, on the hope that the court would grant their request and the prosecution would decide to drop the case.