greasepaint

(redirected from grease paint)
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greasepaint

1. a waxy or greasy substance used as make-up by actors
2. theatrical make-up

greasepaint

[′grēs‚pānt]
(materials)
Makeup made of melted tallow or grease used by theatrical performers.
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References in periodicals archive ?
On a workshop table, defiled with grease paint and chocolate syrup, a sausage-y prop probe awaited its moment.
On display are Max Factor "firsts': an early pair of false eyelashes (invented 1910), "sanitary' tube grease paint (1922), and television's "pancake' makeup (1932), as well as wig blocks for Frank Sinatra, Jimmy Stewart, Gene Kelly, and other stars.
The kind of secret magic that happens when you can smell the grease paint and you can see the mechanics of everything, the fly tower and the dressing rooms and all of that kind of stuff."
TO tread the boards, to smell the grease paint, to perform - training to act or to be part of the theatrical world is something many of us dream of.
Cavalleria has the popular Easter hymn and Intermezzo as part of its musical offering, while Pagliacci contains the famous tenor aria Vesti la giubba (On with the grease paint).
Adrienne had "AA" written in grease paint on her cheek, and Keiyana had "ATHOL" across her forehead.
THE bizarre phenomenon of "politician as celebrity" is fairly recent, boosted hugely during ten years of wall-to-wall exposure to Tony Blair who clearly saw - and indeed still sees - the world as his stage, looks as if he bears permanent traces of grease paint, and acts as if he is, well...
An organised performance like the one at SimonOs keeps the grease paint and feathers at a safer distance.
With eight months before the opening night, Elaine C Smith and Gerard Kelly donned their costumes and applied the grease paint to plug tickets yesterday.
She said: "I've always loved the roar of the grease paint and the smell of the crowd.
Mr Prescott is beginning to resemble the comedian who wants to be taken seriously as an actor; we are witness to the pitiful sight of a man in grease paint, a red nose and large purple shoes trying to play Macbeth.