greasewood


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Related to greasewood: black greasewood

greasewood:

see goosefootgoosefoot,
common name for the genus Chenopodium, as well as for the goosefoot family, Chenopodiaceae, a family of widely distributed shrubs and herbs that includes the beet, spinach, and mangel-wurzel.
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greasewood

[′grēs‚wu̇d]
(botany)
Any plant of the genus Sarcobatus, especially S. vermiculatus, which is a low shrub that grows in alkali soils of the western United States.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dominant shrubs are greasewood and rabbitbrush, with lesser amounts of tree cholla and sandsage.
But with shade cover sparse on the desert floor among the greasewood and yucca plants, Ostrem assured me this was precisely the terrain where javelina preferred to hole-up during the high-noon heat of a typical West Texas day.
It was obvious that the scraggly haired young doctor, along with his precipitously pregnant wife, was genuinely welcome in Lower Greasewood because the people realized that Western medical treatment was beneficial.
It shouldn't be the death penalty," he said as we followed the trail of a group of migrants through a jumble of lava-hot volcanic rock, mesquite, greasewood and cat's-claw brush in triple-digit heat.
This fancy fully-carved and lined 1911 holster was made by Dudley Lewis of Greasewood Leather, also from Arizona.
bush, greasewood, irreversible; deaths December 1992.
greasewood, hediondilla, jarilla, larreastat) Germander Abnormal liver function or Banned in France and (Teucrium damage, often irreversible; Germany.
Chaparral (Larrea Abnormal liver function FDA warning to divaricata, creosote or damage, often consumers in bush, greasewood, irreversible; deaths December 1992.
Chaparral (Larrea Abnormal liver FDA warning to divaricata, creosote function or damage, consumers in December bush, greasewood, often irreversible; 1992.
Vegetation in Owens Valley is atypical of many habitats used by elk in North America, and consists largely of uplands dominated by saltbush (Atriplex spp.) and rabbitbrush (Chrysothamnus nauseosum), dry lowlands of alkali scrub that support greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus) or saltgrass (Distichlis spicata), riparian areas along the Owens River composed of stands of cottonwood (Populus fremontii) and willow (Salix spp.), tule (Typha domingensis) marshes in flooded lowlands, irrigated pastures, and agricultural fields.
The moist saline depressions and the dry beds of rivers are often covered by the greasewood (Sarcobatus vermiculatus, Chenopodi-aceae), another shrubby chenopod that only grows 5 ft (1.5 m) tall but has a root system 7 ft (2 m) deep.
By, October mule deer are wearing winter blues--a brownish, silver-grey that in low light blends with sagebrush and greasewood like melted butter on buckwheats.