great circle


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

great circle

Geometry a circular section of a sphere that has a radius equal to that of the sphere
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

great circle

The circular intersection on the surface of a sphere of any plane passing through the center of the sphere. A sphere and its great circles are thus concentric and of equal radius. Compare small circle.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006

Great Circle

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

A great circle is any circle drawn on a sphere, the plane of which also passes through the inside of the sphere. Great circles are the basis of various systems for locating terrestrial and celestial bodies in terms of sets of coordinates expressed in degrees of a circle. Longitude and latitude are the most familiar of these coordinates. Astrology utilizes several systems of celestial coordinates. Parallel to the manner in which terrestrial coordinates are great circles drawn on the surface of Earth, celestial coordinates are great circles drawn on the inside of the celestial sphere. The ecliptic, the celestial equator, and the prime vertical are examples of some of the great circles used in astrology.

The Astrology Book, Second Edition © 2003 Visible Ink Press®. All rights reserved.

great circle

[′grāt ¦sər·kəl]
(geodesy)
A circle, or near circle, described on the earth's surface by a plane passing through the center of the earth.
(mathematics)
The circle on the two-sphere produced by a plane passing through the center of the sphere.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

great circle

great circle
Two great circle in a sphere.
A circle on the surface of the sphere (earth) whose center and radii are those of the sphere itself. Only one great circle may be drawn through two places that are not diametrically opposite on the surface of a sphere. The shortest distance between any two points on the surface is the smaller arc of the great circle joining them. An aircraft following a great circle (other than directly true north or south) will have to alter course constantly. The intersection of a sphere and a plane that does not pass through its center is called a small circle.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
Although Great Circle's previous system was adept at handling these e-claims, the new EHR has added some efficiency by allowing the ability to develop custom invoices and apply back to patient balances.
Great Circle are amongst the best life rafts available in Australia.
The European ATS route network was improved over the past years and the routes implemented are currently only 3.6% longer than the Great Circle. An initial assessment of the European ATS route network design, availability and utilisation indicates that flight efficiency could be further improved by enhancing both route availability and utilisation (Flight Efficiency Plan 2008).
Rather than step through [THETA] positions, the great circle method rotates the EUT through all [THETA] positions for each successive [PHI] setting.
This article focuses on the countries located in the great circle and their relations with the global powers.
The Great Circle opens to the east with only one entry-way leading into the twelve-hundred-foot diameter circle flanked by fourteen-foot walls.
As a part of the Forum professional program, attendees had the option of signing up to tour the UPS Anchorage Gateway, located on the great circle route that is the shortest distance from North America to Asia.
If we use the spherical model then such a bearing line means the arc of a great circle. Approximating the area of spherical equidistant triangle which side length equals 400 km as a flat Euclidean triangle makes a difference of ca.
The stone-dressing work on the monument's great circle (both uprights and lintels) was accomplished by working parallel to the long sides of the stones, while the five stone 'trilithons' (the great horse-shoe arrangement of linteled stones) within the great circle were dressed by working at right-angles to the sides of the stones.
In other words, we show that forces cannot keep any such point at rest or make it move uniformly along a great circle of [S.sup.3], results that occur in Sections 5 and 6.
fly it some Great Circle Route back to the cupboards, bare of memories?