great soil group

great soil group

[¦grāt ′sȯil ‚grüp]
(geology)
A group of soils having common internal soil characteristics; a subdivision of a soil order.
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2016), a lookup table (LUT) method based on the great soil group (GSG) map, an approach based on bioturbation and geomorphic extension of soil formation factors (D50) and the Australian K-factor map produced by CSIRO (K_CSIRO) based on the soil visible-near infrared spectroscopic database (Teng et al.
Office of Environment & Heritage (OEH) (2017c) Great Soil Group (GSG) Soil Type map of NSW.
Soil erodibility (K-factor) maps using eight methods: Universal Soil Loss Equation (K_USLE), revised USLE (K_RUSLE), SOILOSS (K_SOILOSS), a geometric mean diameter-based model (K_Dg) and its revised version with the addition of an organic matter component (K_Dg-OM), a look-up table method based on the great soil group map (K_GSG), an approach based on bioturbation and geomorphic extension of soil formation factors (K_[D.sub.50]) and the Australian K-tactor map produced by CSIRO (K_CSlRO) based on the soil visible-near infrared spectroscopic database.
Soil classification to Great Soil Group (Stace et al.
Minimum, maximum, and average values of estimated plant-available water capacity (mm) and maximum recharge rate (n, mm/day) for each great soil group
Number of soil types within each great soil group; PAWC, plant available water capacity (mm); n, maximum or potential rate of recharge (mm/day) below the root-zone under saturated conditions Soil type Soil physical Min.
Keen to introduce Russian ideas on soil science to the scientific community in the United States, Marbut translated Die Typen der Bodenbildung into English.53 Glinka, who communicated with Marbut while the latter worked on the English translation, described Marbut's endeavor as being part of the "struggle to find a common language for the study of soils in our countries." (54) Marbut's English-language version was published in 1927 under the title The Great Soil Groups of the World and Their Development, (55) Thus we see Glinka's original notes in Russian translated first into German and then into English.
(53) Konstantin Glinka, The Great Soil Groups of the World and Their Development, trans.
In the former, Stace (1968) described 43 Great Soil Groups differentiated by central concepts of morphology, distribution and land utility, which, although easy to understand, were not explicitly defined (Mazaheri et al.
A secondary aim is to identify the informative shared characters in the Suborders and Great Soil Groups, based on their distinguishing morphological and non-morphological character-states, and the impact of nonmorphological, continuous and colour characters on the ASC.
(1983) have approximate correlations of Great Soil Groups (Stace et al.
Morand (1994, 1996) used Great Soil Groups (Stace et al.

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