hallux

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Related to great toe: hallux malleus

hallux

[′hal·əks]
(anatomy)
The first digit of the hindlimb; the big toe of a human.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cartiva's lead product, a Synthetic Cartilage Implant (SCI) for treating arthritis at the base of the great toe, received U.S.
Caption: Figure 5: Coronal T1 fat-saturated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the foot obtained with gadolinium contrast administration demonstrated marginal erosions at the great toe interphalangeal joint, associated synovitis, and bone marrow enhancement (black arrows).
The most commonly used sites are on the great toe (plantar and dorsal), but there is no evidence to confirm that this is the most sensitive location for testing.
The toenail of the right foot great toe has thickening of the distal part of the nail, with onycholysis (separation of the nail plate from the nail bed), yellow discoloration, and subungual debris.
"She also required skin grafting, had the partial amputation of her left great toe, fusion of her left ankle and wiring and pins in her left foot with the need for prosthetics.
In 1896, at the Societe de Biologie, he described the normal flexion of the toes as resulting in the stimulation of the sole of the feet, and also the extension of the great toe during dysfunctions of the corticospinal tract.
Free digital transferreport of a case of transfer of a great toe to replace an amputated thumb.
We have five digits, comprising three phalanges for fingers and two for thumb and great toe on each hand and foot.
To accurately and deeply illustrate the plantar loading features, the foot was divided into seven anatomical regions, which are rearfoot part (RF), midfoot part (MF), lateral forefoot part (LFF), central forefoot part (CFF), medial forefoot part (MFF), great toe part (GT), and other toes part (OT).
Hallux valgus is a deformity of the foot characterized by medial deviation of the first metatarsal with associated lateral deviation of the great toe. (1) It is relatively common, with the pooled prevalence in the general population being reported as 23% (range 16.3% to 29.6%).