greater ebb

greater ebb

[′grād·ər ¦eb]
(oceanography)
The stronger of two ebb currents occurring during a tidal day.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
With the game taking on a much greater ebb and flow, Valentine was forced to clear off the Dragons' goal-line after Ruddy failed to take Hurst's cross, before the Bury forward almost latched onto a dangerous through ball.
A year after her death, the North American Review was asserting that Aurora Leigh "was written, not by Elizabeth Barrett, but by Browning's wife," and made of the epic tale simply a "story of love, as it lay concealed in the heart of a woman, to rise in overmastering strength at the fulness of time." (10) In the same year, the Dublin University Magazine asserts that "she would never have reached so high a point if she had not married a great poet." (11) The greater EBB's achievement, the greater her reliance on Browning; the broader her reading, the greater her indebtedness to a range of predecessors.
In fact by this time at least the greater ebb and flow made it far more pleasing on the eye.

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