green aircraft

green aircraft

A flyable aircraft not fitted with avionics or furnishings, as specified by the customer or standard of preparation.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
References in periodicals archive ?
The Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) studies conducted by Boeing and Nasa found that a 150-seat strut-braced wing aircraft (may enter service by 2040) could be about 30% more fuel-efficient than, for example, today's Boeing 737-800.
The products we selected were Extreme Simple Green Aircraft cleaner, Aero Cosmetics Belly Soap, Corrosion Technologies N'viro Solve and Arrow-Magnolia Carbon-X.
In an article in CDR back in 2016, Stephane Villeneuve, Vice President, Specialized Aircraft, at Bombardier, commented, "We're not just delivering a green aircraft; our engineers are actively working with Saab to develop capabilities."
Success of the Compass Call acquisition strategy hinges on its ability to use documented established costs applied to a green aircraft and assurance that "existing systems/subsystems" will be rehosted.
Work on the green aircraft at Bombardier's facility in Toronto, Ontario, Canada, has also ramped up, with eight customer aircraft currently progressing smoothly through final assembly.
Designed to represent the passion and dedication of true New York football fans and with the rallying call to Play Like a Jet, the new scheme features a full green aircraft and more prominent Jets branding.
"The first development trend Airlander sees after the launch of the Airlander 10 will be to make an already green aircraft even greener," says Daniels.
The Jolly Green aircraft commander, Capt John Gillespie, noted, "Circling in the valley with a 1,000 foot or less ceiling, Maj Clarke used his [ADF] to vector my aircraft into the valley The two aircraft, A-7D and HH-53, then began the long run inbound to the survivors." Clarke maneuvered him along the ingress route, avoiding villages and areas of suspected AAA concentrations to the ridgeline where the survivors were located.
One of these concepts, the SUGAR Volt, is being developed through the Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) program, a line of research being pursued by Boeing as part of NASA's Fundamental Aeronautics Program.
And the current trend for highly efficient and green aircraft, as well as the degree of wing variations needed to produce a practical aerodynamic change in small or low-speed vehicles, makes the weight penalty even more unacceptable.