green roofs


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green roofs

A natural heating/cooling alternative that provides thermal insulation and evaporative cooling due to water circulating from plants. See also: Heating/cooling systems
References in periodicals archive ?
This month's article about vegetated roofs (page 26) will help you to evaluate the bumper crop of sustainability and cost benefits that a green roof can provide.
Admittedly, green roofs are complicated, expensive and require ongoing maintenance, but they turn an ugly, underused part of a building's real estate into a major asset.
This will allow hotels, offices, hospitals and other commercial properties to finance green roofs while preserving capital and potentially qualifying for off balance sheet treatment.
Several studies about green roofs and green walls focused on thermal performance of single roofs or walls (Cheng et al.
Although the green roof market continues to grow, there is still an enormous potential for new green roofs to be installed on tens of billions of square feet across North America.
Green roofs, depending on how they're set up, can also massively reduce energy usage since they insulate the roof of the building where the most heat is lost.
Green roofs may seem like a new development, but they've been in use for nearly 100 years.
NO LONGER A novel, fringe feature, green roofs at healthcare facilities now have a good decade under their belt, during which time significant advances have been made in plant technology, installation systems, irrigation strategies, roofing structures, design processes, and maintenance protocols.
Green roofs also reduce the need for air conditioning, thus lessening the "urban heat island" effect--a phenomenon in which concentrated human activity and energy use make metropolitan areas hotter.
Green roofs are important technology and planning tools that can be used to help urban center to respond to the climate changes and improve urban environmental quality.
While green roofs are incredible engineering feats that provide insulation and storm-water management, their lush greenery could be putting building owners and managers at risk for an invasion of pests.
Further afield, there are wineries with green roofs in New Zealand, including Mt.