greenwashing


Also found in: Dictionary, Financial, Idioms, Wikipedia.

greenwashing

Making a point of how environment friendly a company is, when, in fact, nothing is actually done to accomplish that end. Greenwashing is false advertising in order to be more respected in today's world. See EPEAT and greenware.

Greenwashing

Misleading information given by an organization so as to present an environmentally responsible public image that conceals its true environmental impact.
References in periodicals archive ?
While these studies provided an understanding of the financial incentives associated with CSR and the rewards generally associated with it, the data studied in these earlier articles left open the possibility of greenwashing and the resulting information misuse or disinformation to the detriment of the consumer.
The most common greenwashing strategy, the group says, is when a company touts an environmental program or product while its core business is inherently polluting or unsustainable.
8) The main problem with greenwashing is that it misleads consumers into buying products based on the erroneous belief that the products have some environmental benefit.
Mientras esto ocurre, es previsible que la gente vaya desenmascarando sola el greenwashing haciendo uso de los poderosos recursos que proporcionan las redes sociales digitales.
I think we have passed the peak of greenwashing and today there is less, due to increased education.
Most people don't set out with a goal of greenwashing.
Ads with fluffy language about being "eco-friendly," which make irrelevant claims about being best in class of a dirty class, or which emphasize one tiny attribute when the rest of the operation is not so clean are other signs of greenwashing.
UL sees the program as a logical extension for the organization as businesses increasingly tout the eco-friendliness of their operations and their products--and the public grows increasingly wary of greenwashing.
According to the report, a rise in green marketing efforts has been matched by a nearly equal rise in claims of greenwashing by activists, bloggers and others.
These are subterfuges designed to allow business-as-usual to continue, under a pretense of action, a greenwashing.
The most obvious, and least frequent, form of greenwashing is to make a demonstrably false claim.
The green movement is no exception, and Greenwashing - misleading consumers or exaggerating a company or product's environmental status in order to get a share of the green pound - is rife.