gregarious


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gregarious

1. (of animals) living together in herds or flocks
2. (of plants) growing close together but not in dense clusters
References in classic literature ?
We were sociable and gregarious, and these singing and laughing councils satisfied us.
Fe Bajada, many large black spiders, with ruby-coloured marks on their backs, having gregarious habits.
I am disposed to be gregarious and communicative to-night," he repeated, "and that is why I sent for you: the fire and the chandelier were not sufficient company for me; nor would Pilot have been, for none of these can talk.
He did not know that he was himself possessed of unusual brain vigor; nor did he know that the persons who were given to probing the depths and to thinking ultimate thoughts were not to be found in the drawing rooms of the world's Morses; nor did he dream that such persons were as lonely eagles sailing solitary in the azure sky far above the earth and its swarming freight of gregarious life.
It is one great advantage of a gregarious mode of life that each person rectifies his mind by other minds, and squares his conduct to that of his neighbors, so as seldom to be lost in eccentricity.
If the feline in your life is good - or gregarious - enough to be Cat Of The Week, send a photo and details to polly.
Ordinary Lies BBC1, 9pm Wendy is a gregarious forklift truck driver who likes a good time and enjoys joking with her colleagues at Coopers.
Rebekah Staton Ordinary Lies BBC1, 9pm Wendy is a gregarious forklift truck driver who likes a good time and enjoys joking with her colleagues at Coopers.
He was always outgoing and gregarious, and loved and lived life on his own terms.
But when they throw a party, the gregarious owl smells Edmond's delicious nut jam, which leads him to invite the little squirrel to share in the adventure and company
Amongst the Grand Serail's visitors had been Greek Catholic Patriarch Gregarious III Lahham.
The discovery, described in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on June 5, reveals that the pterosaurs -- flying reptiles with wingspans ranging from 25 cm to 12 m -- lived together in gregarious colonies.