partridge

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Related to grey partridges: Hungarian partridge, gray partridge

partridge,

common name applied to various henlike birds of several families. The true partridges of the Old World are members of the pheasant family (Phasianidae); the common European or Hungarian species has been successfully introduced in parts of North America. In some areas of the United States the name partridge is applied to the ruffed grousegrouse,
common name for a game bird of the colder parts of the Northern Hemisphere. There are about 18 species. Grouse are henlike terrestrial birds, protectively plumaged in shades of red, brown, and gray.
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, the bobwhitebobwhite,
common name for an American henlike bird of the family Phasianidae, which also includes the pheasant and the partridge. The eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus) is about 10 in. (25 cm) long.
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, and the plumed quailquail,
common name for a variety of small game birds related to the partridge, pheasant, and more distantly to the grouse. There are three subfamilies in the quail family: the New World quails; the Old World quails and partridges; and the true pheasants and seafowls.
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; in Europe the South American tinamou is called a partridge. The gray partridge, Perdix perdix, is an Old World bird of about 1 to 1 1-2 ft (30–45 cm). True partridges are classified in the phylum ChordataChordata
, phylum of animals having a notochord, or dorsal stiffening rod, as the chief internal skeletal support at some stage of their development. Most chordates are vertebrates (animals with backbones), but the phylum also includes some small marine invertebrate animals.
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, subphylum Vertebrata, class Aves, order Galliformes, family Phasianidae.
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partridge

[′pär·trij]
(vertebrate zoology)
Any of the game birds comprising the genera Alectoris and Perdix in the family Phasianidae.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

partridge

1. any of various small Old World gallinaceous game birds of the genera Perdix, Alectoris, etc., esp P. perdix (common or European partridge): family Phasianidae (pheasants)
2. US and Canadian any of various other gallinaceous birds, esp the bobwhite and ruffed grouse
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Khan said that black and grey partridges and chukkars can only be acquired from breeders, particularly in Punjab, after fulfilling the licence conditions set by the provincial wildlife department.
Similarly, just only the first egg left uncovered was episodically documented in the grey partridge (Perdix perdix) by Sprake (1930).
2012) such as the grey partridge Perdix perdix or the willow grouse Lagopus lagopus.
Grey partridge numbers have plummeted by more than 80% in the last 40 years and the birds have become extinct in many parts of the country due to habitat loss and a reduction in insects, which are an essential food for their chicks.
Trust spokeswoman Morag Walker said grey partridges were once widespread on mixed arable land across the country, with more than a million pairs of the birds estimated to have been breeding in Britain in 1911.
* DECLINE: The grey partridge * THREAT: A turtle dove
The grey partridge is smaller with a distinctive orange face You are most likely to see partridges on the ground on farmland, although you would be lucky to see our native grey partridge, as they are a red listed species.
The Duke's Northumberland Estates business picked up the pounds 4,000 first prize at the Purdey Awards in recognition of its work helping to stop the national drop in the number of grey partridges.
Shooting estates are being asked not to kill grey partridges after numbers have plummeted by 80% in 40 years.
At this stage, approximately from four weeks before the first egg is laid and onwards, grey partridges are already relatively site faithful, which means that the detected grey partridges are representative for the considered site.
Dr Sotherton said many factors have contributed to the decline of grey partridges on British farmland, including the introduction of herbicides and pesticides into modern farming, which has reduced the availability of important chick food, and the loss of suitable habitat for brood-rearing and nesting.