Apgar score

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Apgar score

[′ap·gär ‚skȯr]
(medicine)
An index used to evaluate a newborn infant's physical condition based on a rating of 0-2 for each of five criteria: heart rate, respiratory effort, muscle tone, response to stimulation, and skin color.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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The Hamburglar, Grimace, and Birdies appearances were courtesy of McDonald's Owner-Operator David Bear and Bear Family Restaurants.
If the rigorous screening process at airports makes you grimace, your next visit to the Sistine Chapel will make it seem like cakewalk.
The team, consisting of Georgia Guery, Sarah Webster and Bethany Silezin, all 12, impressed the judges by successfully spelling words such as simulate, exempt and grimace.
I STILL grimace when I see pics of the tearful "jungle queen" Christopher Biggins.
Prison officials disputed media and witness accounts that Diaz appeared to grimace and gasp.
Having been forced to grimace his way through a barnstorming Labour conference speech by Tony Blair, and at least give an impression of enjoyment, he has had to digest some unwelcome news from the bookies.
Netherton goalkeeper Oliver Littleford saved the first effort only for the ball to rebound off Sykes (hence the grimace) and finish in the net.
So that's not just four years of that insufferable Blair look of false sincerity and four years of Mrs Blair's gaping mouth - but now also four years of the Gordzilla grimace.
There should be something in this issue to delight (or infuriate) just about everyone, so go ahead and grin or grimace as appropriate.
Of course," he adds with a grimace, "in some places things can't get worse." CONTACT: Western Watersheds Project, (208)788-2290, www.
Everyone was eager to congratulate Phil, except DiMarco, who thought a grimace and a curt handshake would suffice.
The faces are arranged in order from smiling and happy, representing "pain free," to an extreme grimace, representing "severe pain."