gross stress reaction

gross stress reaction

[¦grōs ′stres rē‚ak·shən]
(psychology)
A transient personality disorder in which, under conditions of great or unusual stress, a normal person utilizes neurotic mechanisms to deal with danger.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Korean War, mental health professionals used the expression gross stress reaction, a term taken from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-I) of the American Psychiatric Association, which was published in 1952.
The absence of gross stress reaction left psychiatrists without a concept for understanding and treating those exposed to extreme stress.
2006) Gross Stress Reaction Korean War DSM-I (American (1950-53+) Psychiatric Association, 1952) Transient Situational 1968 DSM-II (American Disturbance Psychiatric Association, 1968) Post-Vietnam Syndrome Vietnam War Symptoms presented in large numbers of veterans, resulting in clustering of combat-related trauma effects (Figley, 1978; Friedman, 1981; Wilson, 1980) Post Traumatic Stress 1980 DSM-III (American Disorder Psychiatric Association, 1980) Combat Stress Reaction Gulf War Campise et al.