gross stress reaction

gross stress reaction

[¦grōs ′stres rē‚ak·shən]
(psychology)
A transient personality disorder in which, under conditions of great or unusual stress, a normal person utilizes neurotic mechanisms to deal with danger.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the Korean War, mental health professionals used the expression gross stress reaction, a term taken from the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-I) of the American Psychiatric Association, which was published in 1952.
Thus, when the first DSM was published in 1952, the category of "gross stress reaction" was included to formally acknowledge reactions to traumatic stress in civilian life.
Prior to this time, such emotional problems had been more loosely defined in the DSM-I as "stress reaction" and in DSM-II as "gross stress reaction."