grotto

(redirected from grottoes)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

grotto

1. a small cave, esp one with attractive features
2. a construction in the form of a cave, esp as in landscaped gardens during the 18th century
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Grotto

A natural or artificial cave, often decorated with shells or stones and incorporating waterfalls or fountains.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Grotto

 

in architecture, a type of park structure (sometimes a pavilion) designed to resemble a natural cave and built and finished with material such as seashells, tuff, and sea rocks. Grottoes were particularly popular in garden and park architecture of the 17th and 18th centuries (in Russia, from the 18th century).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

grotto

A natural or artificial cave, often decorated with shells or stones and incorporating waterfalls or fountains.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The book designed by Longmen Grottoes Research Institute highlights eight sets of the most representative paintings from the grottoes, said Yu Ying, head of the Longmen Grottoes Scenic Area Administration Commission.
"The colors of most Buddhist images in the grottoes have faded after more than 1,000 years of weathering.
The carving of the grottoes started 1,500 years ago.
But it takes a look at the grottoes of Christmas past to see why this time-honoured tradition has become a magical miracle for many
He said: 'Grottoes take up a lot of space and I think a lot of big shops would rather have extra shelves to sell more stuff in the run-up to Christmas.
'We can do something about it if the public unite and demand their grottoes back.
Unlike so many other grottoes of both the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, it did not have the room for automata--figures of animals and mythological characters that 'performed'--sometimes spraying the unwary with water for the amusement and wonder of spectators.