ground elder


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ground elder

ground elder

A food source imported into England by the Romans that got out of control. Also called Bishop’s weed, has white flower clusters like poison hemlock, but leaves are very different, more like an Elder (but unrelated). Small white 5-petal flowers. Very invasive nuisance plant that takes over other plants, even a tiny piece of root left in ground grows new plants, making this is a limitless food source. All aboveground parts are edible (not roots) Young leaves used as salad greens. Pinch off pre-flowering bugs to keep leaves more nutritious. Plant is diuretic and laxative. Used medicinally for gout, arthritis, rheumatism, bladder disorders. Has triangular stem (no toxic lookalike does)
Edible Plant Guide © 2012 Markus Rothkranz
References in periodicals archive ?
Clipping away the ground elder revealed them in all their glory (see pic).
The only way to tackle it in established beds is to dig up your cultivated plants and carefully tease out the white roots of the ground elder. Just be warned that you need to remove every single white strand of root from the earth when you do dig the ground elder up.
The only way to tackle it in established beds is to dig up plants and carefully tease out the white roots of the ground elder. You must remove every single white strand of root.
Even the much-loathed ground elder started its British life as a popular plant: it was brought here by the Romans because of its ability to alleviate the symptoms of gout.
No sooner have you weeded the beds and borders during a fine spell than you'll have to do it again following a downpour, as seedlings emerge and difficult perennial weeds such as ground elder, couch grass and bindweed do their worst, climbing up plants or spreading their underground roots so they are virtually impossible to eradicate.
So far I haven't had time to do much, with the exception of waging war on the ground elder infestation.
Nettles and docks always give the game away, but you'll get away with ground elder flowers as they look quite pretty.
GET RID OF THE LAST OF THE WEEDS Try to dig out any pernicious perennial weeds you see lurking, such as bindweed, couch grass and ground elder. You'll need to dig them out completely, root and all, as if you leave any fragments of root in the soil they will come back in spring.
4 GET RID OF THE LAST WEEDS TRY to dig out any pernicious perennial weeds you see lurking, such as bindweed, couch grass and ground elder. You'll need to dig them out completely, root and all, as if you leave any fragments of root in the soil they will come back in spring.
Don't add meat, fish or bones to the heap because you'll just attract rats, and keep out really tough weeds such as ground elder, which may survive in the heap, and diseased plants, which should be binned or burned.
Similarly reluctant to surrender is ground elder. These beasts can grow 5-6ft a year if you let them.
Wrth ochr y llwybr roedd llysiau'r gymalwst (Aegopodium podagraria; 'ground elder') yn tyfu'n dal a chryf.