ground loop

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ground loop

[′grau̇nd ‚lüp]
(aerospace engineering)
A sharp, uncontrollable turn made by an aircraft on the ground during landing, taking off, or taxiing.
(communications)
Return currents or magnetic fields from relatively high-powered circuits or components which generate unwanted noisy signals in the common return of relatively low-level signal circuits.
(electricity)
Potentially detrimental loop formed when two or more points in an electric system that are nominally at ground potential are connected by a conducting path.

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Simplex burner.
i. An uncontrolled turn on the ground either on takeoff or, more often, on landing in a tail-wheel aircraft. Also called a ground loop
ii. To turn a propeller by hand to start the engine.
iii. To calibrate compass deviation by recording its values at predetermined intervals and correcting the deviation to the extent possible.
iv. The sudden yaw of a multiengine airplane when one of the engines, especially the one away from the centerline, fails.
v. In aerial photography, it is the angle measured in the plane of the photograph from the positive y-axis clock-wise to the nadir point.

ground loop

A circular path created between the data lines and the ground wires when electronic devices communicate with each other. When systems have earth grounds through different power sources, differences in reference voltages can cause problems for various reasons (see inter-system ground noise). See ground.


The Ground Loop
The ground loop is created because all the equipment is wired to earth ground.
References in periodicals archive ?
Signal conditioning with proper isolation will break the ground-loop and eliminate its effects on the integrity of the measurements.
Major electronic conditioning considerations are amplification for the reading of low-level signals, isolation for safe usage of high-voltage signals and the breaking of ground-loops, and filtration of protecting signals from unwanted noise.
The fundamental task in designing hybrid GHP systems lies in properly balancing the size of the supplemental component and the size of the ground-loop heat exchanger, while optimizing the control of the supplemental component.
Ground-loop Heat Exchanger Model: This component model is a modified version of that developed by Yavuzturk and Spitler (1999), which is a response factor (referred to as g-functions) model based on the work of Eskilson (1987).
The fundamental task in designing hybrid GHP systems lies in properly sizing the supplemental component and the ground-loop heat exchanger, using an appropriate control algorithm for system operation so that annual heat rejection and extraction loads in the ground can be balanced.
This definition was chosen for practical reasons, because when significant ground-loop reduction occurs in these types of hybrid systems, the designer must choose a cooling tower to ensure that the peak building load will be met by the hybrid GHP system.