grounded theory


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grounded theory

any form of sociological theory that is built up gradually from the careful naturalistic observation of a selected social phenomenon (see also ANALYTICAL INDUCTION). As outlined by Glaser and Strauss The Discovery of Grounded Theory (1968), sociological theorizing of this type contrasts with more abstract general theories of the ‘hypothetico-deductive’ type (see HYPOTHETICO-DEDUCTIVE EXPLANATION AND METHOD). Compare also THEORIES OF THE MIDDLE RANGE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Glaser and Strauss (1967) do not prescribe how to conduct research using the grounded theory method in their seminal work.
In this issue, Kerr (2013) reports on a study in which she used grounded theory to examine medical-surgical clinical nurses' decision making about charting by exception.
Grounded theory research: procedures, canons, and evaluative criteria.
Using the applied thematic analysis and the constant comparative approach based on grounded theory resulted in five themes in the area of issues and four themes in the area of resolutions.
The aim of this paper is to describe the Constructivist Grounded Theory approach as described by Charmaz (2006) which was used as part of a PhD study to investigate the process of therapeutic engagement and professional boundary maintenance by mental health nurses.
Asi nos lo demuestran varios autores, entre los mas relevantes Charmaz (2006), Emerson (1983), Katz (1983), Goetz y Le Compte (1988) y principalmente Glaser y Strauss (1967), autores de la Grounded Theory (Teoria Fundamentada-Teoria Anclada), llegan a la investigacion cualitativa a traves de la denominada "tecnica inductiva", de gran utilidad para generar teoria y llegar a hipotesis a traves de casos iniciales.
Grounded theory analysis of the observational data produced a description of dynamics around the infant, varying from experiences of emotional connectedness and containment (Matrix), to those of confusion, pressure and fragmentation (Tornado), dissociation (Machine) and drift or provisionality (Limbo).
Because of all these problems, the current paper rationalises the use of grounded theory (GT) as an alternative socio-technical approach for requirement analysis.
This article reviews the results of a qualitative grounded theory dissertation study that examined how practitioners in an alternative and correctional education setting identified students with emotional and behavioral difficulties for special education services, given the criteria for ED.
In this section, we present six qualitative research traditions: grounded theory, phenomenology, consensual qualitative research (CQR), ethnography, narratology, and participatory action research (PAR).
Among the topics are new mediations in clinical relationships, studying health policy in a comparative perspective, what grounded theory is and where it comes from, qualitative interviewing techniques and styles, making sense of personal illness journeys with autoethnography, practical research ethics, and the challenges and opportunities of qualitative health research with children.
A critique of the three most commonly used qualitative research approaches of phenomenology, ethnography and Grounded Theory are provided as examples that may be used.