group selection


Also found in: Medical, Wikipedia.

group selection

[¦grüp si¦lek·shən]
(evolution)
Selection in which changes in gene frequency are brought about by the differential extinction and proliferation of the local population.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The primary challenge of comparison group selection for rolling entry interventions is defining a baseline period for potential comparison group individuals who do not enter the intervention.
The target structure for both single tree and group selection distributes volume among three diameter size classes: 10-30 cm: 20%, 30-50 cm: 30%, and >50 cm: 50% (Matic et al.
We design a similarity matching algorithm for optimal user group selection based on dynamic time warping [34].
The number of observations within each sector varied for each multiple, depending on the approach to peer group selection and the specific multiple in question.
However, like conventional mathematical models in which group selection might work, this approach further assumes the repeated isolation, mixture, and reisolation of groups.
For years, many competent believers in evolution had trouble with this problem and rejected the whole concept of group selection. They insisted that everything group selection tried to explain could be better explained by principles like kin selection and reciprocal altruism.
The nonprogressive character of the debate between the proponents of inclusive fitness and the proponents of group selection can be attributed in good part to the false alternatives offered in the formula repeated by Wilson and Wilson.
He lays a foundation for the discussion by operationalizing altruism, presenting the oselfish geneo hypothesis as well as group selection theory, and discussing the concept of equivalence in causal explanations.
Both tutorial group selection and assignment of treatment occurred using random selection, using the random number generator available at random.org.
Wilson believes that to answer this question, we must turn to evolutionary theory, and especially to a theory known as group selection, which holds that better adapted groups produce more offspring, with the result that their traits are passed on.
Nonindustrial landowners may alternatively choose group selection, where openings are smaller.

Full browser ?