group theory


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Related to group theory: Ring theory

group theory

[′grüp ‚thē·ə·rē]
(mathematics)
The study of the structure of groups which especially deals with the classification of finite groups.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harpe, On problems related to growth, entropy and spectrum in group theory", J DYN CONTROL SYSTJ., vol 3, no.
Colloquium keynoter was Shirley Ardener of Oxford University, co-author with Edwin Ardener of writings in the 1970s that first explicated the muted group theory. Other presenters and discussants included Cheris Kramarae, whose Women and Men Speaking in 1981 was largely responsible for bringing muted group theory to the attention of communication scholars; Julia Wood, the scholar widely recognized as making the earliest applications of standpoint theory within communication; Jan Dates, whose work has examined mainstream media depictions of African Americans; Mark Orbe, who used both muted group and standpoint theories in developing a theory of co-cultural communication; and Thomas Nakayama, author of works exploring Asian American communication and the identity of whiteness.
To further his interests in British politics and group theory, John did research in England on the British Legion during the 1954-55 academic year on a fellowship from the Fund for the Advancement of Education.
In order to do this, he invented a mathematical technique called group theory, which turned out to be useful a century later in working out quantum mechanics, one of the two great physical theories developed in the twentieth century that successfully describe the Universe.
However, a flaw in the industry group theory, which determines 30 percent, is it incorrectly assumes a stock has no unique characteristics.
In particular, it might be possible to avoid a proof of the B-Conjecture, an important but difficult result in finite group theory, established only with great effort.
He starts at the basics: a basic introduction that defines terms and establishes a perspective is followed by several pseudo-code examples and fundamentals of discrete mathematics and group theory in the context of software testing.
Chapters address group theory, commutative rings, Galois theory, noncommutative rings, representation theory, advanced linear algebra, and homology.
Finally, Derbyshire introduces famous 19th- and 20th-century mathematicians and the development of complex numbers, vector spaces, group theory, and topology.
Joining together: Group theory and group skills (7th ed.).
A 2-hour lesson on classroom management using small group theory was selected based on its ties to constructivist pedagogy.