group therapy

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Related to group therapist: group psychotherapy

group therapy

Psychol the simultaneous treatment of a number of individuals who are members of a natural group or who are brought together to share their problems in group discussion

group therapy

the practice of treating psychological disturbance through a face-to-face group process of sharing experiences and emotions and, through this, moving towards greater self-understanding and adjustment. This form of therapy was introduced in the 1930s by J. L. MORENO, who founded psychodrama and sociodrama, and coined the terms. Since the 1940s, Carl ROGERS has actively developed the method, particularly in encounter groups which aim to provide a developmental experience for people termed ‘normals’. Therapy groups, generally, have a group leader or ‘facilitator’, as the composition and the programme of a group needs to be carefully planned and controlled for its purpose to be realized in all members. A variety of theoretical approaches may underpin this type of therapy, for example, psychodynamic, Rogerian, feminist.

group therapy

[¦grüp ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including utilization of interactions of members of the group.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the plan was to structure the 2014 group around topics suggested by participants themselves, there was also an implicit psychodynamic goal: the group therapists also intended to create an awareness of the unconscious forces and emotions that shaped participants' experiences of themselves and the world and to facilitating new ways of connecting.
But a group therapist is ethically responsible for trying to remedy such conditions.
Usually the group therapist or the observers of group work judge about the fact of the objective self-disclosure.
Not jumping in to fix the silence also allows the group therapist to make use of the silences that have the most obvious meaning: those that occur immediately before or after highly charged issues that are the most productive for emotional work.
In the second example, where the group divides into competing factions, the group therapist who is able to use "the group as a whole" is likewise able to use the split for creative purposes.
Even the seasoned group therapist feels considerable terror in becoming the target of the anger for a group whose members may have committed acts of violence.
Later, he emphasizes that a group therapist is essentially powerless over abstinence, and that therapists must be "honest and authentic rather than persuasive or coercive.
It will be a valuable read for anyone working with groups, not necessarily just for family therapy, and therefore a useful addition to the reading list for group therapy training as well as for group therapists already in practice.
More than friends, we are each other's intellectual companions and group therapists.
The book lacked any recommendations on how group therapists may facilitate spiritual/religious discussions, how they may incorporate it into the group, or how the group counselor may be challenged by the groups' discussion in light of his or her own spiritual/religious beliefs.
Group Process Made Visible demonstrates the usefulness of the language of art in enabling group therapists and their clients to understand group members' perceptions of constructs and realities.
An exhaustive researcher who plowed into issues of women's health in creating her 1994 play ``The Waiting Room,'' Loomer collected plenty of stories from people throughout the infertility and adoption fields - from doctors, lawyers, support group therapists and would-be parents.