group therapy


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group therapy

Psychol the simultaneous treatment of a number of individuals who are members of a natural group or who are brought together to share their problems in group discussion
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

group therapy

the practice of treating psychological disturbance through a face-to-face group process of sharing experiences and emotions and, through this, moving towards greater self-understanding and adjustment. This form of therapy was introduced in the 1930s by J. L. MORENO, who founded psychodrama and sociodrama, and coined the terms. Since the 1940s, Carl ROGERS has actively developed the method, particularly in encounter groups which aim to provide a developmental experience for people termed ‘normals’. Therapy groups, generally, have a group leader or ‘facilitator’, as the composition and the programme of a group needs to be carefully planned and controlled for its purpose to be realized in all members. A variety of theoretical approaches may underpin this type of therapy, for example, psychodynamic, Rogerian, feminist.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

group therapy

[¦grüp ′ther·ə·pē]
(psychology)
Application of psychotherapeutic techniques to a group, including utilization of interactions of members of the group.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Moreover, it is possible that patients who have attended a multimodal treatment (individual and group therapy) had felt more valued for having received more assistance and/or a better service, thus increasing their satisfaction with treatment and therapeutic involvement.
She argues that Bion's notion of the 'nameless dread' is useful in understanding the group dynamics that seem to be typical of group therapy in this particular context.
Of these, 15 people gave up treatment, leaving 47 patients, of which 27 met the eligibility criteria, such as: having dysphonia detected based on a perceptiveauditory evaluation by a speech therapist and an otorhinolaryngological report, not having previously undergone speech therapy for voice disorders, so that it was possible to attribute the results solely to the group therapy; not having more than two absences and/or not giving up treatment; not presenting any comorbidity that affected cognition and/or communication, preventing them from meeting the protocol during evaluation.
In addition, a review of the literature reveals a number of studies that demonstrate a positive correlation in the general population between group therapy and levels of depression and anxiety (Dugas, Ladouceur, Leger, Langoulis, Freeston, Prouvencher and Boisvert 2003; Michalak, Schultze, Heidenreich, Schramm.
The fourth noteworthy factor in regard to spiritual group therapy is related to some procedures and techniques and also the impact of prayer, benediction, and communication with God.
Given the specificity of the text, I would not recommend it as a primary text for a graduate level dos in general group therapy, but it could be used as a suggested supplemental text for a group psychotherapy or bereavement course.
"When notifications showed up on my facebook with 'Dude, your remix was played on Group Therapy', I was frozen in happiness -- before jumping around in my apartment with my good friend Rino Wilhelmsen.
This study seeks to assess and compare the therapeutic process for two girls victims of sexual abuse who were treated according to the cognitive-behavioral group therapy model proposed by Habigzang et al.
In an information sheet drawn up to explain her service and her concept, Mrs Barkhuizen argues that health, wellness and productivity, can all be enhanced by guided group therapy that illuminates the relationship between a positive self-image and wellness.
This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on anorexia nervosa in female adults and concludes by offering 14 group therapy lesson plans for anorexia nervosa that therapists may use in their practice.
This article considers the use of group therapy to explore sexual identity questions in light of religious beliefs and values.
This edition contains three articles that offer information for school counselors, college counselors, and those professionals who work in the community providing group therapy. Each of the articles went through numerous reviews and revisions to insure the information offered was accurate, relevant, and practical.