guano


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guano

(gwä`nō), dried excrement of sea birds and bats found principally on the coastal islands of Peru, Africa, Chile, and the West Indies. It contains about 6% phosphorus, 9% nitrogen, 2% potassium, and moisture. Guano is found mixed with feathers and bones and is used as a fertilizer.

Guano

 

the decomposed (in dry climate) droppings of gulls and other sea fowl.

Guano is used as a valuable nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizer; it contains about 9 percent nitrogen and 13 percent phosphoric acid, potassium, and calcium. Accumulations of guano are found on islands off the coasts of Chile, Peru, and South Africa as well as on the islands of the Caribbean. Guano is also the name given to the artificially prepared (mainly in Japan and Norway) mineral fertilizers from the waste products of the fishing and seal-hunting industries.

guano

[′gwän·ō]
(materials)
Phosphate- and nitrogen-rich, partially decomposed excrement of seabirds; used as a fertilizer.

guano

1. 
a. the dried excrement of fish-eating sea birds, deposited in rocky coastal regions of South America: contains the urates, oxalates, and phosphates of ammonium and calcium; used as a fertilizer
b. the accumulated droppings of bats and seals
2. any similar but artificial substance used as a fertilizer
References in periodicals archive ?
But in the 1860s, people began collecting the guano to use as fertilizer for farms.
From bolus samples, two fungal Aspergillus and Fusarium and one bacterial Bacillus genera were recorded throughout the year while from guano Bacillus was the only genus with year round occurrence.
Published in (http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms13444) Nature Communications under the title "Contribution of Arctic seabird-colony ammonia to atmospheric particles and cloud-albedo radiative effect," the study says: "Ammonia from seabird-colony guano is a key factor contributing to bursts of newly formed particles, which are observed every summer in the near-surface atmosphere at Alert, Nunavut, Canada.
Critique: All the more impressive when considering that "Guano" is Quebec author Louis Carmain's debut as a novelist, this exceptionally well crafted and original story is an outstanding and thoroughly engaging entertainment from beginning to end.
On the usually rainfree Chincha Islands off the coast of Peru, frequent mists help the unleached guano to mature without being washed away.
At various times between 1873 and about 1910, the island was intensively mined for guano (Bowen, 2000).
Meantime, simple maintenance like cleaning up guano goes undone and perhaps unnoticed.

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