gust lock


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gust lock

A ground lock for aircraft controls used to prevent wind from damaging the control surfaces by knocking them against their stops. These can be either built-in or external locks that are slipped between the movable and fixed surfaces. See control lock.
References in periodicals archive ?
The NTSB determined the probable cause to be (in part), "the flight crewmembers' failure to perform the flight control check before takeoff, their attempt to take off with the gust lock system engaged, and their delayed execution of a rejected takeoff after they became aware that the controls were locked.
Attached to each gust lock was a long, red canvas ribbon--easily seen--and a length of flexible cable, about four feet long, that was attached to a 10-pound metal ring.
It did so by preventing the throttles from moving if the gust lock was engaged.
The preliminary report from the National Transportation Safety Board on the May 31 crash at Hanscom Field outside Boston also indicated a possible problem with a mechanical gust lock system on the Gulfstream IV, which protects aircraft components from wind damage while planes are parked.
While this aircraft was tied down, its control yoke was secured in the full-aft position with a seat belt instead of the approved gust lock device.
Believe it or not, one pilot paged through the advisories and warnings on the MFD too quickly, released the rotor brake while the gust lock was still engaged and destroyed the gust lock
I was looking out the port side at my wing when my COTAC tried to stow the gust lock and lock the wings in place.
The NTSB also said Gulfstream should modify the gust-lock system on the G-IV, to be sure that crews can't accelerate to take-off speed with the gust lock engaged.
And these are the kinds of situations leading us to forget removing a gust lock, checking the oil or adding fuel.
The report states the aircraft's flight data recorder showed "the elevator control surface position during the taxi and [attempted] takeoff was consistent with its position if the gust lock was engaged.
Then there was the other Florida pilot, this time of a C172, who couldn't rotate on takeoff and ran off the end of the runway, at which point he noticed the gust lock still in place.
In one instance, we needed gust locks that were not part of the Air Force inventory.