gynoecium


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gynoecium

[gī′nē·sē·əm]
(botany)
The aggregate of carpels in a flower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both taxa are (at least sometimes) tall trees, which is unusual in Bunchosia, and both have a densely tomentose three-carpellate gynoecium.
The morphoanatomical characteristics of the gynoecium, such as the pachychalazal ovule, and internal tegument restricted to the micropyle region, indicates which tissues are present in the fruit and seed of S.
K C A G: calyx, corolla, androecium, and gynoecium, respectively), along with 13 drop-down menus (Figure 4).
Whether enantiostyly promotes the increase of pollen dispersal phase of cross-pollination (Fenster 1995), reduces the probability of damage to a fragile gynoecium during buzz pollination (Dulberger 1981) or does not promote outcrossing itself, is being studied.
However, other aspects of floral morphology (tallest stamen height, and gynoecium length) did not vary significantly among color classes (in both cases [F.
Pistils, collectively called the gynoecium (ji-NEE-see-um), are the female reproductive parts of the flower and occupy a central position within the flower.
If so, and if this allocation had a genetic basis, then a negative genetic correlation might exist between allocation to the androecium and the gynoecium of flowers.
Here's a word you probably don't know unless you've studied ancient Greek history: gynoecium (plural, gynoecia) is the "women's apartments" of a house.
Significant among-population variation occurs for absolute allocation to androecium, gynoecium, perianth, pericarp, and seed mass (table 3).
Gynoecium initially bicarpellate, bilocular, and with two ovules per locule, gradually elongating from a yellowish green, completely submerged by the nectary disk, then turning asymmetric, conical, bright purplish-red, conspicuously exserted during anthesis, with one locule and three of the four ovules aborted; style and stigma not differentiated except by the subapical epidermal cells that are heavily striate during elongation.
The gynoecium is hypogynous, and the stamens are mostly dipostomone type with some gamostemone.
In SGLA, the taxon can be recognized by having oblanceolated stipules with acute apices; leaves with two pairs of lanceolate-elliptical, papyraceous, glabrous leaflets; oblong-lanceolated external sepals and the presence of a strigulose indumentum on the gynoecium and fruits.