gynoecium


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

gynoecium

[gī′nē·sē·əm]
(botany)
The aggregate of carpels in a flower.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stamen attachment: to gynoecium = 0; to petals (epipetalous) = 1; to receptacle = 2.
The second, "without gynoecium characters" uses the same matrix and the same parameters as the first analysis but the character state for characters 20 (carpel number), 22 (style number), and 23 (stigma shape) in Solanites brongniartii has been changed to "?
In some rain-dispersed plants of otherwise polysymmetric groups (with disymmetric gynoecium) the fruits (and the gynoecium at anthesis) are pronouncedly monosymmetric, such as Tiarella and some Chrysosplenium species of Saxifragaceae.
Tiarella and some Chrysosplenium species have a monosymmetric gynoecium giving rise to fruits with rain dispersal (see above).
Vascular anatomy of the flower of Carica papaya with special reference to the structure of the gynoecium.
ACC synthase and ACC oxidase transcripts were detected in the gynoecium (stigma and ovary) and in the labellum.
A female flower consists only of a gynoecium, which is subtended by a modified prophyll termed the utriculus or perigynium (Timonen, 1998) enveloping the pistillate flower, and often a rudimentary spikelet rachilla (Fig.
Smets (1986, 1988a, 1988b) restricted the term "disk nectary" to a secondary emergence of the receptacle (nectaria axialia) when there is no homology possible with staminodes and when it is not part of the gynoecium.
The bond is usually only transient, so that the gynoecium is completely apocarpous before and after anthesis.
The Stapelieae were defined by pollinia attached to the caudicles at their bases, anther sacs not embedded in the tissue of the anther wings, anther wings always below the level of the anther sacs, and style head separated from the ovaries by a sharp constriction, with the gynoecium devoid of a "true style.
However, the "flowers" still show a mixture of flowerlike and inflorescencelike features: the common stamen-tepal superposition resembles an axillary relationship and can be considered more akin to "inflorescence" than to "flower"; the gynoecium is made up simply of carpels inserted on the floral axis and is consequently just like that of a conventional flower; the phyllotactic sequence of the "flower" is nevertheless continuous through the initiation of the stamen-tepal associations and the gynoecium.
Development of the inflorescence, androecium, and gynoecium with reference to palms.