gyre


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gyre:

see oceanocean,
interconnected mass of saltwater covering 70.78% of the surface of the earth, often called the world ocean. It is subdivided into four (or five) major units that are separated from each other in most cases by the continental masses. See also oceanography.
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gyre

[jīr]
(oceanography)
A closed circulatory system that is larger than a whirlpool or eddy.
References in periodicals archive ?
The basic features in the simulation results were as in the conical basin, with the anticyclonic and cyclonic gyres resulting from the balance between the pressure gradient and the Coriolis acceleration.
That's five years to get from the Pacific to the Atlantic, where they then join the Atlantic Gyre."
The Gyres are described by Yeats as a system made of "a series of unresolved antinomies (...) [which] must find its representation in a perpetual return to the starting point." (9) This is symbolized as two interlocked cones, "the apex of each vortex in the middle of the other's base." (10) As each gyre diminishes, its opposite increases until it has reached its limit and then begins to decrease in turn.
Computer models have shown the slowing and speeding up of the subpolar gyre can influence the entire ocean circulation system."
And its deceptive reverse, emanating from a point and returning to it, the gyre of unbelievable credence.
A word new, I think, to Longley's critical lexicon is "gyre," used to invoke or suggest an imaginatively cognate (even if differentiated) poetics or aspect of the cultural-poetic to the one she is directly discussing.
The researchers took 11 samples over 3 days in a high pressure convergence called the North Pacific central gyre, where the ocean current collects debris.
On the western side of the Gulf, a depression of the thermocline resulted from the advection of warm surface waters on their way to the Gulf's interior as they form an anticyclonic gyre.
One Good Turn recounts his broadening gyre of historical research and, in the process, reminds us that extraordinary stories sometimes lurk behind ordinary things.
While similar in subject-matter to Mary Ackworth Orr's Dante and the Astronomers (first edition 1913; revised edition 1956), and Richard Kay's Dante's Christian Astrology (Philadephia, 1994), this book builds on and resembles most closely some articles of John Freccero (i.e., "Pilgrim in a Gyre," "The Neutral Angels," and "The Final Image").
The gyre turned in ever-widening circles only to circle back upon itself.
It states that history is cyclical and recurrent, proceeding for the individual as well as for mankind in a gyre, or corkscrew pattern.