gyrus


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gyrus

[′jī·rəs]
(anatomy)
One of the convolutions (ridges) on the surface of the cerebrum.
References in periodicals archive ?
Listening: Areas of activation were observed bilaterally in the superior parietal lobule (BA 7), the superior and middle temporal gyrus (BA22), the insula (BA13) and the postcentral gyrus (BA7) of the left hemisphere, in the superior temporal gyrus (BA42) of the right hemisphere.
The normal cingulate gyrus follows a curved horizontal course similar to that of the corpus callosum.
Scientists have shown that the left superior temporal gyrus may help connect the sounds of speech to written letters.
Gyrus boss Brian Steer said: "This offer is an outstanding opportunity.
Using special imaging techniques, researchers found that a one-hour exercise session--including 40 minutes of aerobic exercise--enhanced the growth of nerve cells (neurons) in the dentate gyrus.
Gyrus, a manufacturer of visualization and tissue management systems and instruments, signed a 10-year agreement with The Offshore Group for the rental of 34,822 square feet of industrial space, as well as for outsourced manufacturing support services at the La Angostura Industrial in Saltillo.
But when patients had both increased age and OSA, decreased brain activation was noted, compared with younger patients, specifically in the right superior temporal gyrus and anterior cingulate, and in the bilateral parahippocampal gyri, caudate, precuneus, cerebellum, and fusiform gyrus, said Dr.
Cardiff-based Gyrus told investors that it was ready to roll out a number of "potentially significant" new products in 2006.
Gyrus performed laboratory tests later on a prototype and confirmed the FEA results.
Next-door, the angular gyrus (a gyrus is a "ridge" in the brain) helps to make sense of the words and letters we come across when reading.
To determine if Broca's area plays a critical role in human imitation, we conducted a repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) study, transiently disrupting cortical activity in three sites: the left inferior frontal gyrus (Broca's area), right inferior frontal gyrus, and an occipital control condition.
All seven used normal "working memory" areas; the bilateral visual processing areas; the left parieto-superior frontal network; the bilateral inferior temporal gyri; the left intraparietal sulcus and the preceritral gyrus.