habitus


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Related to habitus: body habitus

habitus

[′hab·ə·təs]
(biology)
General appearance or constitution of an organism.

habitus

‘the durably installed generative principles’ which produce and reproduce the ‘practices’ of a class or class fraction (BOURDIEU, 1977,1984). Centrally, the habitus consists of a set of ‘classificatory schemes’ and ‘ultimate values’. These, according to Bourdieu, are more fundamental than consciousness or language, and are the means by which groups succeed, or do not succeed, in imposing ways of seeing favourable to their own interests. While each habitus is set by historical and socially situated conditions, it also allows new forms and actions, but is far from allowing the ‘creation of unpredictable (or unconditioned) novelty’.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is this habitus, until now, that lies at the core of anti-Chinese attitudes in our country.
Thus, in order to unveil and understand the dynamic mechanisms of production and reproduction engendered within any level of the formal school system, concepts like habitus, field and the typology of capitals (as well as their uneven distribution) are rather useful.
Desse modo, o habitus do agente corresponde a um conjunto de predisposicoes que se constroem a partir da incorporacao dos diversos capitais simbolicos, bem como do volume total destes capitais que os sujeitos possuem nos variados campos.
FORMS OF CAPITAL AND HABITUS IN THE DECISION TO STUDY ABROAD
Rather than Le Dejeuner sur l'herbe deriving from Marcantonio Raimondi's engraving of Raphael's lost work, The Judgment of Paris, it emerges from the habitus of Eduoard Manet expressed through the social field of his time and society (322).
Literature was a way to advertise the learning of Inns-educated men as well as to "demonstrate and shape the habits and habitus of innsmen" (225).
This has created social inequality throughout the country, broadened the variety of habitus, and generated new forms of ethos.
This analysis also draws on Simmel's (1903/1950) distinction between rural and urban lifestyles to theorise rurality as a part of habitus. Simmel's aim to understand how rapid social change forges new social relationships is relevant to late modernity with its constant economic, social and technological transformations and changing forms of cultural representations.