hadal


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hadal

[′hād·əl]
(oceanography)
Pertaining to the environment of the ocean trenches, over 4 miles (6.5 kilometers) in depth.
References in periodicals archive ?
The main purpose of this paper is to further advance geochemical studies in the hadal zone by using time-series observations and the first measurement of [sup.222]Rn above the trench bottom.
Until today Abu Hadal says she is trying to perfect both--her spoken Arabic and her kitchen creations.
When the trend of increasing TMAO in bony fishes with depth is extrapolated to hadal depths, the point at which the fishes would become isosmotic (osmoconforming) with seawater is 8000-8500 m, coinciding nicely with the maximum depth of fish from database records and observational data.
It seems likely, therefore, that at least some agglutinated foraminifera living at extreme hadal depths build their homes from material that sinks down from the ocean above.
Detritus-eaters are mainly represented by amphipods (lissianassids), polychaetes, brittle-stars, and fish, but only amphipods go down to the hadal zone.
When asked about the safety of sending people into the hadal zone -- the Hades zone, or depths greater than 6,000 m -- Hawkes replies, "the only sure way to be safe is to be dead....
Since the retirement of the Trieste and the French bathyscaphe Archimede in the early 1960s, no nation has had the capability to dive much below 10,000 feet (6000 meters) into the unexplored hadal zone, located pormarily in the deep canyons winding around the Pacific Rim and into the Indian Ocean and the Caribbean Sea.
The Hybrid Remotely Operated Vehicle Nereus was being operated as part of the Hadal Ecosystems Studies (HADES) Program funded by the U.S.
Earlier this month Khaled Hadal Al-Qahtani, another wanted militant, surrendered to Saudi authorities.
The geographical distribution of the abyssal and hadal (ultra-abyssal) fauna in relation to the vertical zonation of the ocean.
(5) HADAL ZONE: Such extreme depths are mostly found in deep-water trenches and canyons.
(4) Thyasirids have a much wider distribution than other chemosymbiotic bivalve families; they are found from coastal to hadal depths, in different types of sediments, and from both poles to the equator.