hadrosaur


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hadrosaur

[′had·rə‚sȯr]
(paleontology)
A duck-billed dinosaur.
References in periodicals archive ?
In January, researchers working on Vega Island near the Antarctic Peninsula discovered a tooth and toe bones of a hadrosaur, formerly known to have lived only in the Americas, says Michael O.
Heaman and his research colleagues have several theories as to why the New Mexico hadrosaur came from a line of dinosaurs that survived the great mass extinction events of the late Cretaceous period (KT extinction event).
Palaeontologist Spencer Lucas of the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science agreed that the fossil resembled hadrosaurs, but without some actual dinosaur bones to associate with the skin impressions, there will always be good reason to be sceptical.
Tanke speculates the rib wounds may have been the painful legacy of combat between hadrosaur males.
Jeyawati is a close relative of the duck-billed hadrosaurs, which were abundant across the Northern Hemisphere for much of the Late Cretaceous Epoch, between 80 and 65 million years ago.
In contrast, the long bones of the hadrosaur embryos were capped by incomplete joints, even though they were closer to hatching than the hypsolophodontid specimens.
For the hadrosaurs, a four-legged gallop would also have put too much stress on their bones, so it is most likely they moved at slower speeds on four legs and reared up to run on two.
The hadrosaur bones on the North Slope are found in the stratified layers of sedimentary rock in the bluffs overlooking the Colville River.
In addition to the fossils found in the Iberian Peninsula, hadrosaur fossils have been found in the Netherlands, which date back to Late Cretaceous, "although the material is more fragmented than those found in Huesca and Lleida," added Pereda-Suberbiola.
You can't imagine a 20-foot hadrosaur going after a butterfly," Chin says.
Chin points out that the shelled animals were probably at least 5 centimetres, big enough that a hadrosaur would have noticed and could have spit it out if it wanted, the way that ducks spit out bits of food they've decided aren't worth eating.
She located it amid the stones, and I came over to where she was squatting, inspecting the bulbous, rough-surfaced three-toed track of a hadrosaur.