hematogenous

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Related to Haematogenous: hematogenous, haematogenous spread

hematogenous

[¦hēm·ə¦täj·ə·nəs]
(physiology)
Pertaining to the production of blood or of its fractions.
Carried by way of the bloodstream.
Originating in blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
The proportion of men with haematogenous metastases was significantly greater in the group aged <50 years (75%) than the other age groups (Fig.
This mimics the paediatric model of acute osteomyelitis, which is similarly associated with minor trauma and which is haematogenous in origin.
Cervix cancers spread by the following routes: to the ovary, direct extension to adjacent organs, lymphatic metastasis, haematogenous spread, and transtubal implantation.6 It most often spreads to the lung, supraclavicular lymph nodes, liver, and bones as distant metastasis.3 Intracranial metastasis is unusual.2-4 Kumar et al reported of 2 brain metastatic cases among 481 patients with cervical cancer.4
Haematogenous metastases were detected by radiography or skeletal scintigraphy.
Numerous theories have tried to explain the spread of organisms from oropharynx to the surrounding vein; haematogenous via the tonsillar vein, secondary to lymphangitis or via direct spread through deep neck spaces.
The organism spreads throughout the body through the haematogenous and lymphatic route with the patient manifesting with a wide variety of signs and symptoms-high-grade fever, myalgia, eschar at the inoculation site, generalised lymphadenopathy and organomegaly.
For unknown reasons, it metastasizes early via haematogenous routes to the lung, liver, and brain.1,2
Whilst, lymph node metastases are often present at diagnosis, haematogenous spread is a rare and late event.
Salient features of subacute osteomyelitis are altered host-pathogen relationship, less common than AHO (Acute Haematogenous Osteomyelitis), lack of signs & symptoms of osteomyelitis and usually mimics benign and malignant tumour.
Contiguous and haematogenous dissemination of the pathogen can lead to extra- pulmonary disease with metastatic infection to brain, bone, and subcutaneous tissue.
Myocardial tuberculosis spreads from mediastinal lymph nodes, tuberculous pericarditis or retrograde lymphatic and haematogenous spread.
Usually, the larynx is infected either by direct spread from the lungs or by haematogenous spread from sites other than the lungs.