Hematoma

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hematoma

[‚hē·mə′tō·mə]
(medicine)
A localized mass of blood in tissue; usually it clots and becomes encapsulated by connective tissue.

Hematoma

 

a localized accumulation of liquid blood in tissues.

A hematoma is formed during hemorrhages if the blood does not infiltrate the tissues (such as the subcutaneous tissue, muscles, periosteum, brain, liver, and spleen) but rather separates them, forming a cavity. The primary cause of hematomas is trauma, or rupture of pathologically altered blood vessels. Small hematomas are resorbed without a trace, but an inflammatory reaction develops, with the formation of a thick capsule, around large ones. Hematomas result in swelling, ecchymosis, pain, and dysfunction of the affected organ. Treatment involves application of a pressure bandage, and treatment with cold the first day and then heat. Surgery is indicated if a liver or spleen hematoma ruptures or if the hematoma suppurates.

References in periodicals archive ?
People suffering from subdural haematoma can become confused and sleepy.
* A represents the largest diameter of the haematoma on axial CT cuts in centimetres, B the diameter of haematoma perpendicular to A on the same cut and C the number of CT slices in which haematoma is visible multiplied by the slice thickness in centimetres.
Haematoma compressing the bladder and/or ureters should be considered in patients with urinary retention during postoperative period of LA.
The changing nature of rectus sheath haematoma: case series and literature review.
Draining the haematoma will reduce the size of the pooled blood, sometimes by removing a portion of the skull or drilling a small hole in it.
Animals with chronic ear infections, ear mites or allergies that cause the ears to itch are at the greatest risk of developing ear haematoma.
It was diagnosed as aural haematoma and decided for surgical drainage at the earliest to avoid any damage to ear cartilage.
Di Renzo, "Umbilical cord haematoma with altered fetal heart rate," Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, vol.
If diagnosed early and managed promptly, the prognosis will be good, and the haematomas may resolve completely.
Gortvai, "Spontaneous Spinal Subdural Haematoma," British Medical Journal, vol.
Mobbs, "A contrast-enhancing lumbar ligamentum flavum haematoma," BMJ Case Reports, vol.