hematopathology

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hematopathology

[‚he·məd·ō·pə′thäl·ə·jē]
(medicine)
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A positive diagnosis of HL was confirmed either by lymph node biopsy assessment reported by the Division of Anatomical Pathology or by bone marrow biopsy assessment reported by the Division of Haematopathology. A staging bone marrow biopsy was routinely performed on all lymph node biopsy-positive lymphoma patients at our centre.
Despite the advancement in technology, the rate of diagnostic errors and the requirement for expert review remains high in haematopathology. One of the main reasons for this is the lack of access to adequate range of special investigations required to make a definitive diagnosis in most centers.
Tan Soo Yong, Senior Consultant, Department of Pathology Singapore General Hospital and Hematolymphoid course Director, said, "Diagnosis in haematopathology requires examination of immunostained sections.This poses a big challenge for postgraduate medical education as it is difficult to provide sufficient material for all participants.
However, the EHA acknowledges that European countries vary in terms of the profile and definition of a haematologist, with some countries considering haematopathology as part of haematology and others considering it a different specialisation.6 In the UK haematopathology is part of haematology and is not a separate specialisation.
Jessica Opie is a consultant in haematopathology at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape Town, and a lecturer at the University of Cape Town medical school.
Peripheral T-cell and NK-cell lymphomas and their mimics; taking a step forward-report on the lymphoma workshop of the XVIth meeting of the European Association for Haematopathology and the Society for Hematopathology.
Particular emphasis in health care and research are the haematopathology, gynecopathologists, Nephropathology, Pneumopathologie, orthopedic pathology and pathology of soft tissue tumors and molecular pathology.
CD33 is expressed in about 90% of blasts in Acute myeloid leukaemia.3 There are extensive, constantly developing applications of immunohistochemistry to diagnostic haematopathology. These applications are useful in diagnosis and in determining prognosis of haematologic malignancies as well as evaluating residual/relapsing disease.