hematuria

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Related to haematuria: haemoglobinuria, microscopic haematuria

hematuria

[‚he·mə′tu̇r·ē·ə]
(medicine)
A pathological condition in which the urine contains blood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Urothelial carcinoma is most common in 6th or 7th decade of life but it is very rare in the younger age and only few cases have been reported.1 Its incidence of < 0.4% in the first two decades of life has been reported in a study by Javadpour and Mostofi.2 A more recent review of previous reports identified 125 patients who were aged <20 years, of whom only 20 were aged <10 years3 It usually presents with gross haematuria.4 Urothelial carcinoma in children is often low-grade lesions, solitary, non muscle invasive, low malignant potential and rarely recurrent.
Conclusion: General practitioners should be encouraged to request ultrasound scan for patients presenting with gross haematuria, as urothelial tumours, if detected early, can be managed effectively with better long term outcome.
Various laboratory findings like proteinuria, its intensity, haematuria, its intensity, ANA, Anti dsDNA, serum C3 and C4 were taken to assess their association with the clinical features like age group, gender and clinical class of lupus nephritis.
Urinalysis revealed pyuria, nitrite positivity and haematuria in majority of the patients.
She has no urological symptoms; no flank pain, dysuria, or frequency or gross haematuria, and neither had she reported experiencing any of these symptoms in the past.
A 58-year-old man presented with macroscopic haematuria, dysuria, and obstructive lower urinary tract symptoms in October 2013.
Severe radiating stitching or bubbling kidney pain with haematuria may be reported, with the entire body appearing to be in a state of pain that emanates from the lumbar region.
Symptoms raising a red flag that plain old benign prostate hyperplasia may not be the underlying cause of lower urinary tract symptoms are painful urination (dysuria) and blood in the urine (haematuria).
Baseline data at the time of renal biopsy were collected which included the following: age, sex, eGFR (4-variable Modification of Diet in Renal Disease Study equation), serum albumin level by BCG dye-binding method, degree of haematuria (as per urine RBC * [10.sup.6]/L, no haematuria if < 10, microscopic haematuria if between 10 and 100, and gross haematuria if > 100), and proteinuria (g/day) or protein/creatinine ratio (mgs/mmol).
This compression often results in haematuria, which has recently attracted increasing clinical attention.
There are several causes of altered colouration of urine, including haematuria, haemoglobinuria, myoglobinuria, nephrolithiasis, UTIs, food dyes, drugs, poisons, porphyria, and allkaptonuria.
Behrman attributed six types of nephropathies in SCD to chronic renal medullary hypoxia: gross haematuria, papillary necrosis, nephrotic syndrome, renal infarction, hyposthenuria, and pyelonephritis, while more recently, RMC was described as the seventh sickle cell nephropathy [5].