hemoglobinopathy

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Related to haemoglobinopathy: thalassemia, Hemoglobinopathies

hemoglobinopathy

[‚hē·mə‚glō·bə′näp·ə·thē]
(medicine)
Any blood dyscrasia resulting from the genetically determined alteration of the chemical nature of hemoglobin.
References in periodicals archive ?
both parents and sister, to investigate a suspected haemoglobinopathy. This included high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and Hb electrophoresis.
The global geographical distribution of the haemoglobinopathy genes is today well documented [3, 4] and it is well known that in Europe, such genes are endogenous mainly in the populations of the south, especially in the countries of the Mediterranean basin and to a lesser extent in some of the countries of Eastern Europe.
Studies were undertaken to look for the prevalence of anaemia, worm infestation and haemoglobinopathy disorders like sickle cell disease, thalassaemia and G6PD deficiency.
However, most of our patients with high Hb in the F window were mostly homozygous [beta]-thalassaemia patients or double heterozygous [beta] thalassaemia/ haemoglobinopathy patients confirmed by Hb-electrophoresis and family studies.
There are limited reports on haemoglobinopathy and malaria in Yunnan.
We conclude that an anaesthetist should be alerted to the diagnosis of haemoglobinopathy in a patient whose cyanosis does not improve even on adequate ventilation with 100% oxygen.
They were presented with their awards at a ceremony in Coventry by Lynne Mathers, haemoglobinopathy nurse from the Diana, Princess of Wales Children's Hospital in Birmingham.
Thalassemia is a haemoglobinopathy and specifically an autosomal recessive disorder.
Thalassaemia is a hereditary haemoglobinopathy that is common in Pakistan.
The high prevalence rate of haemoglobinopathy and Beta-thalassaemia in tribal population in India.
There was no sign of haematological abnormalities such as a haemoglobinopathy or leukaemia.
[7] Haematological alterations associated with malaria are well recognised, but specific changes may vary with the level of malaria endemicity and patient background, haemoglobinopathy, nutritional status, demographic factors and malaria immunity.