hemosiderin

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Related to haemosiderin: hemosiderosis

hemosiderin

[‚hē·mō′sid·ə·rən]
(biochemistry)
An iron-containing glycoprotein found in most tissues and especially in liver.
References in periodicals archive ?
In 1962, Bothwell and Isaacson [9] quantitatively assessed the postmortem haemosiderin content of organs of patients dying of natural causes, and Isaacson et al.
In our patient, urine haemosiderin positivity confirmed intravascular haemolysis and the C3d specificity supported an immune-mediated haemolysis mechanism.
No signal drop-off on CSI Haemorrhage Variable - PET-negative depends on age of haematoma Acute-[up arrow]-T1 Subacute - haemosiderin rim Chronic-T1 [down arrow] T2 [up arrow] GRE-'blooming' Adrenal cyst [up arrow]T2 PET-positive [down arrow]-T1 Infection Intermediate signal Variable; active intensity infection can be PET positive Adrenal lesion Comment Adrenocortical 30% of adenomas are lipid adenoma poor Metastases Non-FDG avid primary tumours have PET-negative metastases Fatty metastases: <10 HU Adrenocortical Evaluate tumour extension carcinoma into IVC, renal veins.
At the same time, retention in ferritin falls, so releasing more iron into the circulation, with reduced storage of redundant amounts both in this protein and as haemosiderin. The reverse arrangement is found when iron within cells is increased (10) (Fig.
He also described the histopathology in two cases as nodular groups of 'small round cells' in the dermis accompanied by haemorrhage and abundant pigment (presumably haemosiderin).
These were accompanied by occasional macrophages containing haemosiderin. There is also marked endothelial swelling with surface fibrin deposits leading to occlusion of the vasa vasora.
Effects of Pb (renal lesions, decreased haematopoietic activity in spleen) and arsenate (haemosiderin deposition in spleen, increased mortality) similar to, but possibly less severe than, those seen in the Pb carbonate or calcium arsenate groups were seen in the Pb arsenate-treated animals, and there were no effects unique to Pb arsenate, nor was there evidence of synergism.
(6) Autopsy in a case of neonatal isolated phrenic nerve palsy revealed haemosiderin deposits at the phrenic nerve and cervical plexus.
Iron is stored as ferritin or haemosiderin, with the principal sites of storage being the liver, bone marrow and spleen.
It was surprising that in only two cases the presence of a ferrous pigment (haemosiderin deposits) could be found by the relevant special staining.
Excess metal ions are stored coupled to storage proteins such as ferritin, haemosiderin. Hydroxyl radical generation can take place when the homeostasis is altered.
This finding may be due to the deposition of haemosiderin laden macrophages in relation to small vessels and bronchioles (15).