hagiography

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hagiography

1. the writing of the lives of the saints
2. biography of the saints
3. any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
References in periodicals archive ?
This "Edenic portrayal" of the human-animal is not necessarily new in Christian hagiographies; saints such as Paul the hermit removed themselves from the temptations of human culture by seclusion in the wilderness among the wild animals.
In the hagiographies, female saints who resisted the patronal systems of Mediterranean household law by clinging to celibacy and dying as martyrs are generally depicted in the most passive, meek, and mild terms-like sacrificial lambs.
The second chapter, titled "Thaumaturgy," contains long sections on the forms of thaumaturgy evidenced in the hagiographies, on spells (including a subsection on the use of scriptures as spells), and on miracles.
The third and fourth chapters focus more closely on the hagiographies' representations of the world within which the missionaries were moving.
The Old English poetic hagiographies, then, lift the devil and his dealings with the saint out of human history and into the spiritual cosmos; the devil "inhabits the timeless, boundless space of mythological symbols" to participate in "the ontological battle between heaven and hell that is simultaneously fought in all places and in all times, through the pawns of demons and saints" (81).
In Worldly Saints, Maiju Lemijoki-Gardner, a Finnish historian, draws largely on the evidence of their hagiographies in a study of Dominican penitent women in Italy between the thirteenth and the early sixteenth century.
She fit the description of holiness in the hagiographies, those miracle-laden stories of saints' lives we were addicted to back then: a quiet, prayerful girl who cared more for God than games.
A recovered academic of religion, Canadian Harding assembles curiosities of Christian lore and legend primarily from scholarly references, including concordances, histories, hagiographies, and biographical and historical dictionaries.
Burrus brings together history, theology, critical theory, philosophy, and autobiography in a dazzling series of readings of early Christian hagiographies that will, by turns, delight, confound, illuminate, and challenge diverse historians, theologians, and theorists.
Much of what is known about beatas comes either from hagiographies of the founding mothers of beaterios or from trial records of those who ran afoul of the Inquisition.
In the second, he provides a historical analysis of the formation of the hagiographies, exploring such factors as authorship and authority, the geography of the authors, the evolution of the hagiographies, and the translation of a biography written around 781.
After such exceptional "hagiographies' as those of Sixtus IV in the Ospedale di Santo Spirito, Rome, and of Pius II in the Piccolomini Library, Siena, individual biographies cede, according to Kliemann, to a concept of genealogy embodied by an ancestor in whom the noble aspirations of the dynasty are made manifest.