hagiography


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hagiography

1. the writing of the lives of the saints
2. biography of the saints
3. any biography that idealizes or idolizes its subject
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
But what about interreligious hagiography? Is there such a sub-genre?
Although the book seems to have been written with an undergraduate audience in mind (which would explain the rather rudimentary definitions of hagiography, relics, ex-votos, and the like), even more advanced scholars will find something to appreciate in Saints Alive.
Collins locates the explanation for the German humanists' creative vigour in the field of hagiography in their desire to use saints' lives as vehicles for the reforms of religious and moral life that they sought to promote.
Eller has offered us something more than a hagiography. In many respects, Recalling a Buddha, when seen in its ideal form in theaters with a community, comes closer to being something like the votive stupa of the Buddhist traditions.
To provide evidence for his thesis, Kleinberg examines several saints' lives in detail while spending intervening chapters analyzing changes in the genre of hagiography. For instance, Athanasius' Life of St.
It is particularly surprising that generic relations between hagiography and the nineteenth-century Bildungsroman have not attracted more critical attention, for suggestive parallels exist between these two text-types: both focus on the formation of individuals, whose lives are often conceived of in terms of a journey; there is in both kinds of writing an emphasis on the interiority of their subjects, and turning points, or moments of revelation, are usually readily identifiable.
Personal Recollections of loan of Arc is linked to fairytale, epic, and hagiography. Fulton's discussion of What Is Man?
In the chapters on hagiography, Martin adduces several examples of 'the virtuous Jew', existing alongside a range of other types, such as those of the sincere but deluded truth-seeker, the wicked sorcerer, or the bloodthirsty murderer.
It comes as no surprise that the subjects of this humanist hagiography were often figures from late antiquity, those Church Fathers, such as Augustine and Jerome, so beloved of classicizing authors from Petrarch on.
The reader gets a heavy dose of Olson's devotion to Flacius and revulsion of Melanchthon, leading this reviewer to wonder whether Olson tends toward presenting a hagiography rather than a biography.
A combination of biography, philosophy, and story, The Great Mission is an hagiography which is unique from the many books previously written about Ball Shem Tov who founded the Chasidic movement.
Despite this, the book is not an exercise in hagiography but an attempt to rescue the family from 'scholarly neglect'.