hairy

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hairy

(1)
Annoyingly complicated. "DWIM is incredibly hairy."

hairy

(2)
Incomprehensible. "DWIM is incredibly hairy."

hairy

(3)
Of people, high-powered, authoritative, rare, expert, and/or incomprehensible. Hard to explain except in context: "He knows this hairy lawyer who says there's nothing to worry about." See also hirsute.

The adjective "long-haired" is well-attested to have been in slang use among scientists and engineers during the early 1950s; it was equivalent to modern "hairy" and was very likely ancestral to the hackish use. In fact the noun "long-hair" was at the time used to describe a hairy person. Both senses probably passed out of use when long hair was adopted as a signature trait by the 1960s counterculture, leaving hackish "hairy" as a sort of stunted mutant relic.

hairy

(topology)
References in periodicals archive ?
05) of soil history, namely a history of chemical fertiliser application (CF) or a history of hairy vetch application (HV) for 9 years.
1996) who studied the effect of rye, hairy vetch, crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.
Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.
In general, Chinese milkvetch (Astragalus sinicus) or hairy vetch (Vicia villosa), as leguminous cover crops, and rye (Secale cerealis) or barley (Hordeum vulgare) as non-leguminous cover crops, are cultivated in paddy soils (Kim et al.
7 kg/da) were respectively obtained from a mixture of oat and Tarim Beyazi variety and a mixture of oat + Munzur 98, which is one of hairy vetch varieties.
Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa) is a winter cover crop used to reduce weed competition and herbicide applications, improve soil quality and tilth, and provide symbiotically fixed nitrogen to nourish crops that follow it.
The species included in the legume group were (in order of decreasing abundance): hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth), crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.
In fall of 1997 we planted five acres of hairy vetch on mostly poor ground foul with weeds that wouldn't grow anything else.
After vegetables are harvested, spade several inches of manure into beds and sow seeds of hairy vetch, white Dutch clover, or winter rye.