hakea


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hakea

any shrub or tree of the Australian genus Hakea, having a hard woody fruit and often yielding a useful wood: family Proteaceae
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
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Allsopp, "Changes in the phosphorus composition of seeds of hakea sericea (proteaceae) during germination under low phosphorus conditions," New Phytologist, vol.
The remedy contains a variety of essences including She Oak, Peach Flowered Tea Tree, Old Man Banksia, Mulla, Bottlebrush, Bush Fuchsia, Billy Goat Plum, Crowea, and Dagger Hakea.
Similar abrupt morphogenetic and anatomical changes between foliage, simple leaves, and trifurcated and spiny leaves co-occurring in the same plant are rare; for instance, they have been reported to occur in Hakea trifurcata R.
Although he had spent much time collecting bugs in the New World tropics, he would vote every time for dry country, beating rabbit bush, Atriplex, creosote in the Great Basin, and now in Australia, wattles, smokebush and hakeas, to name but a few.
Further chapters discuss Xanthorrhoea grass tree medicines with descriptions of early botanical collections in Australia, the medical resource of grass tree resin and its uses as a food, fuel and varnish; floral emissaries covering areas such as Banks' Florilegium naming the genus Eucalyptus, Australian carnivorous plants, bottlebrush, Telopea, Banksia, Grevillea and Hakea. Did you know that vines and trees were sources of water?
Abdul Rasjid, 60, Hardi Hans, 22, and Supriyadi, 32, appeared via video link from Hakea prison, charged with one count each of illegally bringing a group of non-Australian citizens to the country.
This notwithstanding, fynbos habitats in much of the central Cape Fold Belt are subject to aggressive invasion by alien plants (pine and hakea) which threatens large-scale habitat transformation and degradation (Cowling et al.
In South Africa, the invasion of fynbos vegetation (a treeless shrubland and heathland) by trees (species of Acacia, Hakea and Pinus) has led in many areas to the replacement of diverse native plant communities by dense thickets of non-native trees and shrubs.
Shane MW, Lambers H (2005) Manganese accumulation in leaves of Hakea prostrata (Proteaceae) and the significance of cluster roots for micronutrient uptake as dependent on phosphorus supply.
The students at Hakea primary school in Melbourne's less affluent northern suburbs helped us to refine our questions by completing trial versions of the survey, which has since been completed by around 1000 students in Grades 5 to 8 in Victorian schools.
Lamont said that the team studied 51 species of Hakea, and found they could be easily divided into two groupings.