half-caste

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half-caste

Offensive a person having parents of different races, esp the offspring of a European and an Indian
References in periodicals archive ?
At the age of three, when her mother became ill, she was taken to Derby Hospital, where a doctor advised the police to 'take the little half-caste child before her mother gets used to her'.
Accordingly I hold [that] the defendant, being a half-caste Indian, is of Indian origin and is [therefore] not included in the word 'native' as defined in this Ordinance.
Thomas seemingly gave up on instituting the legislation necessary to alter the legal status of Anglo-Africans, however he continued to restrict the rights of Anglo-Africans he regarded as "natives"; for instance, he forbid the "sale of liquor to a particular half-caste who was living [in] native fashion".
Monsieur Desrussie, the director of the Home for Half-Castes, the very person Celanire had come to assist, had just passed from this life to the next.
The children are half-caste Aborigines and the rationale for their removal is justified by the chief protector of natives in Western Australia, an English-born public servant named A.
In some Aboriginal communities, half-caste children were treated as outcasts, especially the girls who became easy sexual prey for both whites and blacks.
Previously described as "being built like a brute" (180), Lionel, or "Lion of the Night" (189), proves disarmed by the stratagems of the "monkey" (181); the half-caste Cocoanut unmasks (or unmans) the latent sexual identity of the "Nordic warrior" (174) and reveals it to be "[h]alf Ganymede, half Goth" (178) - giving an ironic half-caste distinction to the blue-blooded Aryan.
but the half-caste boys simply walked off without any demonstration except ironical cheers for the umpire and no hard feeling at all for their opponents (Times, 31 December 1926).
Hasluck, `The needs of the half-caste community exempt from Aboriginal Ordinance', AA, 452, 55/368, part 2, nd, p.
A 1929 advice from the Attorney-General's Department to the Chief Electoral Office defined an `aboriginal native' as a person in whom Aboriginal descent preponderates, and `that half-castes were "aboriginal natives" within the meaning of Section 127 of the Constitution'.
1941 Survey of the Half-caste Problem of South Australia, Proceedings of the Royal Geographical Society of South Australia 42, 66-161.
In ethnographic texts, for example, the world of the so-called `mixed blood' received increasing attention following the publication of early papers such as Reay's `A Half-caste Aboriginal Community in Northwestern New South Wales' in 1945 (for further discussion of this ethnographic genre, see Anderson 1994).