half-cell potential

half-cell potential

[′haf ¦sel pə′ten·chəl]
(physical chemistry)
In electrochemical cells, the electrical potential developed by the overall cell reaction; can be considered, for calculation purposes, as the sum of the potential developed at the anode and the potential developed at the cathode, each being a half-cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
We have discussed so far general corrosion phenomenon, principle of corrosion, various kinds of corrosion, electrochemical reaction, cells, electrodes, types of cells, thermodynamic principles, electrode potential, measurement of EMF of a cell, Half-cell potential, standard hydrogen cell, reference electrodes, free, energy, pH (Power or fugacity of hydrogen) etc.
[1] DGfZP: Specification B 03, Electrochemical Half-Cell Potential Measurements for the Detection of Reinforcement Corrosion, DGZfP, Berlin, Germany, 2014.
Half-cell potential measurements are one of the most widely used nondestructive methods to monitor and assess steel bar corrosion in concrete structures [21, 22].
The ASTM standard C879-09 was used as a starting point to obtain the half-cell potential. The technique allows one to obtain, through the utilization of a voltage gauge, the difference in potential between a reference electrode and the rebar.
However, half-cell potential has been recognized by many researchers as the main method to detect the corrosion activity in RC structures [6].
Both of the electrical current readings and half-cell potential measurements were used to detect the corrosion initiation in the tested prism samples.
Methods used in these experiments are by measureing half-cell potential [14,15], corrosion potential and polarization resistance [16] in accelerated corrosion condition in laboratory.
A voltage known as the half-cell potential develops across the interface due to an uneven distribution of anions and cations.
It uses the half-cell potential method to locate the areas without the expense and time consumed by demolition.
3 half-cell potential testing readings shall be taken on the northern half of the face of the west abutment on a 500 mm by 500 mm grid.
For this study, the half-cell potential technique is used by obtaining electrical potential on the surface of the concrete.
The most popular method of in situ corrosion testing is the half-cell potential measurement, the idea of which is illustrated in Figure 1(a).