half-wavelength

half-wavelength

[′haf ¦wāv‚leŋkth]
(electromagnetism)
The distance corresponding to an electrical length of half a wavelength at the operating frequency of a transmission line, antenna element, or other device.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, the relationship between the DOA estimation performance and the relative position of the two MCL elements was investigated, and we found that the spacing between the two antenna elements is not limited to the conventional half-wavelength condition due to the amplitude directional properties of the MCL element.
The transmission channel between the proposed antenna and a half-wavelength dipole was evaluated in terms of received power.
Furthermore, Michael's sleuth work found KSWG to be usinga full-wavelength antenna, rather than a half-wavelength spaced antenna.
where w denotes the amplitude of the upwarping deformation and l denotes the half-wavelength of the slabs, just as illustrated in Figure 6.
The MMR consists of a half-wavelength Low-impedance line section in the center and two identical high-impedance line sections at the two sides with respect to the UWB central frequency, i.e., 6.85 GHz.
Proposed basic compact differential filter, i.e., Filter A, is implemented using half-wavelength coupled resonators.
This design comprises two identical basic rings in series, which forms a half-wavelength resonator at the middle of the structure.
Nano-scale magnification reveals that the wing scales comprise many fir-tree shape structures, with vanes spaced a half-wavelength apart.
Originally, most calibration standards called for the use of half-wavelength dipoles for broadband measurements, which made that kind of test very time consuming.
This tends to confine the radiating source to the half-wavelength region between the open end of the choke sleeve and the extended inner conductor of the coaxial line.
When the length of one of the paths changes by just a half-wavelength of light (typically 1/4000 millimeter), the waves change from adding constructively to destructively, turning from bright to dark.
Because light bends, or diffracts, around the edges of objects, ordinary optical microscopes can discern features no closer than a half-wavelength apart, a distance of 200 nanometers (nm) or so.