hall

(redirected from hall of residence)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Wikipedia.
Related to hall of residence: Dorms

hall,

a communicating passageway or, in medieval buildings, the large main room. In the feudal castle of N Europe it was a single apartment, and in it lord and retainers lounged, ate, and slept. From the hearth in its center the smoke rose to an outlet in the roof. At one end was the raised dais reserved for the master and those of his own rank. With developing amenities extra spaces were added for cooking and sleeping, and the hall advanced beyond its early rude and unfinished appearance. In English manor houses of the 14th and 15th cent. the characteristic great hall was covered by a fine open-timber roof, heated by one or more huge fireplaces, and lighted with lofty windows often arranged in deep, projecting bays. Westminster Hall, part of the ancient royal palace commenced in the 11th cent. and rebuilt in the 14th cent., was the most splendid. By the 17th cent., with the addition of drawing room, library, and bedrooms, the hall of the English house was no longer of great size and dominance. The English colleges of the Middle Ages and Renaissance also had halls or commons, chiefly for dining, that were architecturally similar to the baronial examples. Some were covered with fine fan vaults, others with timber roofs as at Christ Church, Oxford, perhaps the most splendid hall next to Westminster. The various guilds of N Europe had their halls, especially impressive in Flanders, e.g., the cloth halls at Bruges, Brussels, and Ypres. In Italy communal independence produced the remarkable series of local civic halls, often with imposing towers, as at Siena and Florence. The word hall came to be used in the title of many great English houses (Haddon Hall) and similarly in that of some Southern estates in the American colonies.

Bibliography

See J. A. Gotch, Growth of the English House (1909).

Hall

A large room or building used for the transaction of public business and the holding of courts of justice; used also for public meetings and assemblies and other entertainment.

hall

1. The main room of a medieval or post-medieval house that served as the center of family life, usually combining the functions of a kitchen, dining room, living room, and workroom for activities such as spinning, sewing, and candle making; often called a keeping room; also see hall-and-parlor plan.
2. An imposing entrance hall; also called a living hall.
3. A large room for assembly, entertainment, and the like.
4. A small, relatively primitive dwelling having a one-room plan.
6. A corridor.

hall

1. a room serving as an entry area within a house or building
2. a building for public meetings
3. the great house of an estate; manor
4. a large building or room used for assemblies, worship, concerts, dances, etc.
5. a residential building, esp in a university; hall of residence
6. 
a. a large room, esp for dining, in a college or university
b. a meal eaten in this room
7. the large room of a house, castle, etc.
8. US and Canadian a passage or corridor into which rooms open
9. Informal short for music hall

Hall

1. Charles Martin. 1863--1914, US chemist: discovered the electrolytic process for producing aluminium
2. Sir John. 1824--1907, New Zealand statesman, born in England: prime minister of New Zealand (1879--82)
3. Sir Peter. born 1930, English stage director: director of the Royal Shakespeare Company (1960--73) and of the National Theatre (1973--88)
4. (Margueritte) Radclyffe. 1883--1943, British novelist and poet. Her frank treatment of a lesbian theme in the novel The Well of Loneliness (1928) led to an obscenity trial
References in periodicals archive ?
Letters containing advice about the disease have been delivered to all students in the hall of residence.
Currently an open-plan office over three floors with some partitioning, it is to be transformed it into a 51-bed hall of residence.
The man, in his mid-20s, was not a student or a member of staff but he somehow managed to get into the university hall of residence in Priory Street opposite the Cathedral.
Hamilton Hall, a St Andrews University student hall of residence, is being bought by an US firm to develop into luxury apartments.
The accident happened at an isolated hall of residence in Reading at 11pm on Saturday night.
Dadak, who has a vile record of ripping off students, operates from an office beneath a hall of residence.
A Birmingham student lay dead in his hall of residence bedroom for up to four days before he was discovered by university staff.
IT is a student hall of residence fit for a prince, and a haven for the Welsh language.
TWO attackers armed with a baseball bat chased a man to the back of Coventry University's Singer Hall of Residence in Gazelle Close, Hillfields, where they beat him up with a baseball bat.
A POLICE officer and his wife were at the bedside of their son today as he fought for his life after he became trapped in a lift shaft in a ``tragic accident'' at a university hall of residence.
A UNIVERSITY student whose bomb hoax prank led to the evacuation of a hall of residence, was ordered to carry out 160 hours community service and pay pounds 1,139 compensation to the fire service yesterday.
I WAS greatly saddened to read your report of the 19-year-old student nurse, Louise Crane, who hanged herself in the hospital's hall of residence just 3 days into her three-year degree course (The Mirror, October 7).