halo effect


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halo effect

[′hā·lō i‚fekt]
(industrial engineering)
A tendency when rating a person in regard to a specific trait to be influenced by a general impression or by another trait of the person.
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As a leader, you have to be very careful in appraising your members because your evaluation might be tainted with The Halo Effect. Just like Paulo, who perceived Richard as the best in my team by virtue of his excellent communication skills which is only one facet of the work my team does.
Co-founder of Capital & Centric, Adam Higgins, said: "The halo effect of delivering Littlewoods Studios will stretch way beyond the studio doorstep.
'Not zoomed in, the sun itself is a very small part of the picture, the dark circle is just a crazy halo effect,' zhx said.
The pilot study found a total "halo effect" of $45 million per year for the 10 congregations--a considerable sum, Wood Daly said, given these 10 make up only a small fraction of Toronto's faith communities.
"The Halo Effect" is a riveting read from cover to cover and very highly recommended for community library Mystery/Suspense collections.
One idea critical to increasing a person's persuasiveness is the so-called "halo effect" -- which doesn't receive as much attention as it should.
Google has finally responded to Pixel and Pixel XL owners' complaints that the camera on the smartphones generates a "Halo Effect" on photos.
According to "The Halo Effect: How Advertising on Premium Publishers Drives Higher Ad Effectiveness," "Premium publishers are more than 3x more effective in driving mid-funnel brand lift metrics, such as favorability, consideration and intent to recommend."
Prolonging the halo effect of the dial, the stones are arranged in varied cuts to form a dazzling architecture of diamonds.
The halo effect is so strong that once we have developed an initial impression, we begin to assume things about another person's character that we have not yet observed, according to Kahneman.
Pierre Bouvard, Chief Insights Officer of Cumulus/Westwood One, says TV's good fortune will have a halo effect on radio too.