Halocarbon


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halocarbon

[¦ha·lō¦kär·bən]
(organic chemistry)
A compound of carbon and a halogen, sometimes with hydrogen.

Halocarbon

Class of man-made chemicals, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), and hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), whose heat-trapping properties are among the most damaging of the greenhouse gases. This, coupled with their tendency to remain in the atmosphere for hundreds of years, has resulted in limits on their use. Halocarbons are most commonly used in refrigeration, air conditioning, and electrical systems, as well as blowing agents in some foam insulation products.
References in periodicals archive ?
This halocarbon reclamation facility will be state of the art with the latest, most advanced equipment for the reclamation and management of Halons and refrigerants that are either ozone depleters or high in global warming potential.
Emissions of carbon dioxide and particularly halocarbons have increased significantly between 1990 and 2005.
2] and which generate hypohalous acids and various halocarbons, such as bromoform (CH[Br.
RMNP's EMS working group, an ad hoc group established to spearhead EMS design and implementation, has ranked the aspects in order of priority, including wastewater management, petroleum storage tanks, contaminated sites, hazardous material management, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), solid-waste management, greenhouse gas emissions reduction, pesticides, green procurement, halocarbons and water conservation.
Particularly sensitive to halogens due to its detection mechanism, it has continued to enjoy popularity as the primary detector for trace level determinations of chlorinated insecticides and halocarbon residues in environmental samples.
Scientists at the US Argonne National Laboratory have recently found a new way to make the solvent substitute, bringing the cost down to about $2 a kilogramme, roughly the same as many halocarbon solvents.
Valves especially designed for common halocarbon refrigerant gases can also be used for other liquefiable gases, such as sulphur hexafluoride.
The RC12E runs at a maximum compressor speed of 1,500 rpm for ammonia applications and up to 1,200 rpm for halocarbon applications (R22, R507 etc.
The halocarbon tracers are clear proof that Los Angeles pollution is seeping far away from its source into the once-pristine desert air.
The chemical name for CFC-113 is 1,1,2-trichloro-1,2,2-trifluoroethane, but it is also known by trade names (*1) such as Freon 113 [R], Genetron 113 [R], Halocarbon 113[R], or Refrigerant 113[R].