halophyte


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halophyte

(hăl`əfīt'), any plant, especially a seed plant, that is able to grow in habitats excessively rich in salts, such as salt marshes, sea coasts, and saline or alkaline semideserts and steppes. These plants have special physiological adaptations that enable them to absorb water from soils and from seawater, which have solute concentrations that nonhalophytes could not tolerate. Some halophytes are actually succulent, with a high water-storage capacity.

halophyte

[′hal·ə‚fīt]
(ecology)
A plant or microorganism that grows well in soils having a high salt content.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although previous studies have found that germination of halophytes can occur in a variety of salinities, many halophytic species favour conditions where NaCl concentration is less than that of seawater (600 mM) and require optimal temperatures for successful germination (Khan and Ungar 1984).
Molecular cloning and characterization of a vacuolar H+ pyrophosphatase gene, SSVP, from the halophyte Suaeda salsa and its overexpression increases salt and drought tolerance of arabidopsis.
Guo YS, Wan-Ke Z, Dong-Qing Y, Bao-Xing D, Jin-Song Z, Shou-Yi C (2002) Overexpression of proline transporter gene isolated from halophyte confers salt tolerance in Arabidopsis.
The four halophytes or salt tolerant plants collected from Kutch, Gujarat were the Abuliton indicum from different region Kalodungar, Bhachav and Nakhtrana, Senra incana, Sida sp.
The world's irrigated acreage could be increased by about 50 percent by reusing saline water and salinized crop fields for halophytes, said University of Arizona environmental sciences professor Edward Glenn.
Mathur N, Singh J, Bohra S, Vyas A (2007) Arbuscular mycorrhizal status of medicinal halophytes in saline areas of Indian Thar Desert.
exilis has also been found in association with other Aizooaceae (Otto 2014) and other halophytes, but almost always in anthropogenic or perianthropic environments.
These drones are best suited to combat in Anbar's deep wadis and the halophyte thickets lining the Euphrates River.
The laughable and lenient sentences handed out by the Australian courts in the Halophyte case to individuals for providing more than $1 million to the LTTE and securing explosives, (The resulting bomb explosion at the Colombo Central Bank killed over 1,400 civilians and maimed thousands) clearly demonstrate the duality of the "anti-terrorism" policies.
With high energy prices and concern over global warming, the halophyte (salt-tolerant plant) is now in demand for its other properties.