hammer forging

hammer forging

[′ham·ər ¦fȯrj·iŋ]
(metallurgy)
Forging by means of repeated blows of a hammer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Cold hammer forging takes place in a huge machine that takes a billet of steelium drilled to fit on a mandrel.
Hammer forging a barrel is very helpful in this regard The process of making a hammer-forged barrel involves first inserting a mandrel through the center of a short, thick cylinder of steel.
On the downside, hammer forging introduces considerable stress to the barrel, which can be difficult to relieve properly.
Hammer forging is pretty much pounding the heck out of a barrel when a rod-like piece containing the groove and land impressions is within the drilled bore.
Hammer-forged barrels are not well thought of by precision rifle shooters but a critical manufacturing process used by the hammer forging guys is suddenly getting attention from custom barrel makers today.
Cold hammer forging of barrels was pioneered after World War Il by Steyr Daimler-Puch and their equipment is now used throughout the world.
Barrels are produced using the cold hammer forging process, using high quality steel.
For example a .30 caliber blank that was 17 1/2" long before hammer forging will be about 24" long when rifled.
Hammer forging is an expensive process, but it's worthwhile because it provides the high level of accuracy found in all Glock pistols.
Hammer Forging My top pick for a barrel that I know will see some abuse would be one that's hammer-forged.
After hammer forging, the bore is NiCorr treated (Ferritic Nitrocarburizing--an advanced form of case hardening) which, according to LWRCI, "is more lubricious, harder wearing and more heat and corrosion resistant than hard chrome." Starting off with a denser, hammer-forged bore surface to begin with--and then treating it with NiCorr--should ensure prolonged barrel life.